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News Updates

  • Marsalis Shows Um Jazz Band A Lighter Touch

    Posted on September 30th, 1997 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis walked onstage unannounced Saturday, at the end of a performance by the University of Miami faculty quintet. The music had been very good up to that point, and the sold-out audience at Gusman Hall on the university campus appreciated what it was hearing.   Keep reading »

  • Keeping a Stageful of Stars to a Single Beat

    Posted on September 13th, 1997 in Review

    The drummer Elvin Jones, who was the implacable rumble suffusing the John Coltrane Quartet, has been celebrating his 70th birthday at the Blue Note this week. In the opening set on Tuesday, with a front line full of guests, the musicians reveled in simple, profound minor-key dirges taken from the post-1960 Coltrane school of hypnotism.   Keep reading »

  • Dizzy Gillespie, the Man and the Music

    Posted on September 13th, 1997 in Review

    Sometimes concerts break up into small parts of great brilliance, and Jazz at Lincoln Center’s ‘‘Dizzy’s Big-Band Bop,’’ the opening concert of its season and a tribute to the orchestral work of Dizzy Gillespie, did just that.   Keep reading »

  • N.Y. Gets Marsalis To Trumpet The Arts

    Posted on August 4th, 1997 in News

    Wynton Marsalis, the first jazz composer to win a Pulitzer Prize for music, is taking a seat on the New York State Council on the Arts in Albany.   Keep reading »

  • Returning Duke’s Love for a City

    Posted on July 2nd, 1997 in Review

    The thick knot of politicians heaved like longshoremen as they pulled on a yellow rope dangling from a pulley yesterday afternoon at Fifth Avenue and 110th Street. The band played ‘‘Satin Doll.’’ Lost somewhere in the cluster of raised arms were Bobby Short, the cabaret singer, and Robert Graham, the sculptor, who had made the event possible.   Keep reading »

  • A Swinging Travelogue, With Ellington as Guide

    Posted on May 13th, 1997 in Review

    How Chinese is Duke Ellington’s ‘‘Chinoiserie,’’ how African is his ‘‘Liberian Suite’‘? Do they become more so by a particularly forceful rendering of a little pentatonic melody, a particularly dense malleting of the tom-toms?   Keep reading »

  • Jazz at the Center

    Posted on May 12th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    When Wynton Marsalis received the Pulitzer Prize recently for his three-and-a-half slavery oratorio, Blood on the Fields, he was the first jazz composer ever so recognized (Duke Ellington was specifically rejected by the board). But Marsalis - whose success at 35 as a composer, popularizer, teacher and institution-builder is unrivaled—is still an angry young man, albeit a charming and eloquent one.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis is first jazz musician to win Pulitzer Prize

    Posted on April 28th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis says becoming the first jazz artist to win a Pulitzer Prize is not about him—it’s about the music. Marsalis won the prestigious prize for music for his epic jazz opera. Blood on the Fields, which focuses on the tragedy of slavery in America. Until now, the Pulitzer Prize for music has traditionally recognized classical compositions.   Keep reading »

  • For Basie, Red Hot Blues

    Posted on April 19th, 1997 in Review

    The blues settled into Alice Tully Hall on Thursday night with the arrival of the singer Dennis Rowland. Mr. Rowland was there to play the role of Jimmy Rushing and Joe Williams for Jazz at Lincoln Center’s show, ‘‘Swingin’ the Blues for Count Basie.’’   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis: Interview by Ted Panken

    Posted on April 14th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    The Reigning Genius of Jazz to his admirers, the Emperor With No Clothes to his debunkers, Wynton Marsalis has attracted public attention and provoked ferociously divergent responses like few musicians in the music’s history. Since his emergence in the early 1980’s as a trumpet virtuoso and composer-bandleader, the result of Marsalis’ choice and treatment of material and his penchant for salty public statements is a public persona akin to a massive lightning rod or magnet that absorbs and repels the roiling opinions and attitudes informing the contemporary Jazz zeitgeist.   Keep reading »