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  • An OffBeat Interview With Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on December 1st, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis is a very prolific writer, but most of compositions have been of the musical variety—notes on staffs rather than words on paper. Until now. The New Orleans-born, multiple Grammy-winning trumpeter, widely considered the most influential jazz musician of his generation, has expanded his repertoire by authoring a 192-page hardback book, Sweet Swing Blues on the Road, in collaboration with photographer Frank Stewart. It is due in bookstores on Dec. 12.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis trumpets the importance of classic jazz

    Posted on October 16th, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis starts off with a simple, definitive statement: “I never use interviews to publicize myself. I like to keep my comments to the music,” he says by phone from his home in New York City. And that he does.   Keep reading »

  • Going a Round With Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on October 13th, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    How do you conduct an interview with Wynton Marsalis? Very carefully. The jazz trumpeter and artistic director for Jazz at Lincoln Center has had a long and sometimes contentious relationship with the press.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis Takes Jazz To Church

    Posted on June 2nd, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Years from now, they’ll still be talking about the concert that lit up a grand old church on the South Side of Chicago. They’ll reminisce about the jazz band that dared to offer a three-hour show from the pulpit of a 19th Century house of worship. They’ll recall how brilliantly the seven musicians played, how frequently the congregation sprang to its feet, how often it fell silent during passages of mystery and reverie.   Keep reading »

  • Ellison Recalled as an Artist of Great Range

    Posted on May 27th, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Hundreds of people who cared about the novelist Ralph Ellison traveled to Washington Heights yesterday to pay their respects to his life and art. They received in return glimpses, small and affectionate, of the man’s expansive soul.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis Takes a Long Look at Slavery

    Posted on April 4th, 1994 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis’s skills have grown as fast as his ambition, and he is the most ambitious younger composer in jazz. On Friday night at Alice Tully Hall, he led the world premiere of his first work for big band, “Blood on the Fields,” a large composition—nearly three hours of music—about a vast topic, slavery. The piece was commissioned by Jazz at Lincoln Center, of which Mr. Marsalis is the artistic director.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz at the White House (Home of a Serious Fan)

    Posted on June 21st, 1993 in

    It had to happen, and when it did, it wasn’t nearly as bad as it could have been. After President Clinton gave his final remarks tonight at the White House jazz festival, the saxophonist Illinois Jacquet handed him a saxophone, and off the band went into Miles Davis’s blues waltz, “All Blues.” Happy to say, the President (who in his early career as a saxophonist had committed Mr. Jacquet’s landmark improvisation on “Flying Home” to memory), didn’t equivocate, change his mind or buckle to pressure, though he did look a bit uncomfortable.   Keep reading »

  • A Red, White and Blues Evening at the White House

    Posted on June 21st, 1993 in Review

    Her’s was the opening salvo Friday evening at the White House in a heady two-hour mix of entertainment and artistry. It was one of those magic evenings when the blues in the night met the green of the lawn—specifically the South Lawn, where a large area was covered with a canopy, under which 30 artists tried to encapsulate much of the music’s history.   Keep reading »

  • Joyfull Jammings at The Blue House

    Posted on June 19th, 1993 in Review

    At night’s end, the First Saxophonist contributed a cool solo to what could be a signature tune for a president—“Every Day I Have the Blues.” Luckily, it’s already the signature tune of jazz vocalist Joe Williams, and while a poll-conscious Bill Clinton clearly might empathize with lyrics like “nobody seems to love me,” his presence last night on a stage with several dozen jazz greats was not weary confession but jubilant confirmation of his regard for the form.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz at the White House

    Posted on June 12th, 1993 in News

    To judge by the historic television program to be broadcast Sunday, America’s recently rekindled love affair with its own music, jazz, is going strong.   Keep reading »