Home» News Updates

News Updates

  • Marsalis, Roberts renew musical bonds in impromptu reunion

    Posted on April 19th, 1995 in Review

    Two reigning jazz virtuosos were reunited in impromptu fashion Tuesday night, and the results were as profound as they were accessible, as technically brilliant as they were musically direct.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz, he says

    Posted on April 13th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis is a perpetual explorer. The 33-year-old premier jazz trumpeter said he continues to develop his art form by experimenting with musical styles and configuration of groups. Marsalis has played R&B, classical and popular music.   Keep reading »

  • A change of key - His Septet behind him, Marsalis takes a new direction

    Posted on April 9th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    It was one of the most sublime jazz bands of the late ‘80s and early “90s, an ensemble so distinctive in personality, so lustrous in tone and so brilliant in technique as to set a standard toward which other young groups aspired.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz Rage

    Posted on March 19th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis, the premier jazz figure of his time, leans against his black baby grand, lovingly explaining the life and legacy of Louis Armstrong to a Brazilian TV crew. The interview was supposed to have ended half an hour ago, but Marsalis waves off his publicist. He is hard into Teacher Wynton mode now, tracing Armstrong year by year from New Orleans to a Chicago ballroom.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis’ music best thing since sliced (nut) bread

    Posted on February 25th, 1995 in Review

    In Biblical terms, finding fault with God is virtually an impossible task. In jazz terms, Wynton Marsalis is God. Take the hint. If there is such a thing as musical perfection, Marsalis and his dazzling quartet showed it last night at Vanderbilt’s Langford Auditorium.   Keep reading »

  • Imitating Armstrong As a Form Of Praise

    Posted on December 22nd, 1994 in Review

    The two programs of Louis Armstrong’s music on Saturday and Monday nights, presented by Jazz at Lincoln Center as part of its series The Armstrong Continuum, clearly represented an enormous amount of work. Nearly 40 pieces were played, with Monday night’s program at Avery Fisher Hall digging deep into Armstrong’s rarely performed orchestral works and Saturday’s at Alice Tully Hall working through the revolutionary early works of Armstrong and King Oliver, among others. It is difficult music, and not just for Armstrong’s trumpet parts; the pre-swing rhythms are hard to make come alive, and the orchestral works, even the barest ones, were often complicated by show-biz virtuosity.   Keep reading »

  • It’s the End of the Riff for Wynton Marsalis’s Septet

    Posted on December 1st, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis made news in his first set on Tuesday night at the Village Vanguard. Before he began to play, the trumpeter and band leader announced that this week’s engagement would be the last for his septet, one of the most influential and active bands in jazz.   Keep reading »

  • An OffBeat Interview With Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on December 1st, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis is a very prolific writer, but most of compositions have been of the musical variety—notes on staffs rather than words on paper. Until now. The New Orleans-born, multiple Grammy-winning trumpeter, widely considered the most influential jazz musician of his generation, has expanded his repertoire by authoring a 192-page hardback book, Sweet Swing Blues on the Road, in collaboration with photographer Frank Stewart. It is due in bookstores on Dec. 12.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis Takes Jazz To Church

    Posted on June 2nd, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Years from now, they’ll still be talking about the concert that lit up a grand old church on the South Side of Chicago. They’ll reminisce about the jazz band that dared to offer a three-hour show from the pulpit of a 19th Century house of worship. They’ll recall how brilliantly the seven musicians played, how frequently the congregation sprang to its feet, how often it fell silent during passages of mystery and reverie.   Keep reading »

  • Ellison Recalled as an Artist of Great Range

    Posted on May 27th, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Hundreds of people who cared about the novelist Ralph Ellison traveled to Washington Heights yesterday to pay their respects to his life and art. They received in return glimpses, small and affectionate, of the man’s expansive soul.   Keep reading »