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News Updates

  • Jazz at the White House

    Posted on June 12th, 1993 in News

    To judge by the historic television program to be broadcast Sunday, America’s recently rekindled love affair with its own music, jazz, is going strong.   Keep reading »

  • Don’t play Duke Ellington like Haydn Trumpet Concerto, says Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on April 11th, 1993 in Profiles & Interviews

    As the first musician ever to have been signed simultaneously to the jazz and classical divisions of Columbia Records, Wynton Marsalis is intimately familiar with the differences and similarities between the two worlds. We spoke to him over the phone, during a tour stop in Boston, and asked what he thought about treating jazz like classical music.   Keep reading »

  • Young man with a horn

    Posted on March 1st, 1993 in Profiles & Interviews

    A couple of months ago I got a phone call from a writer working on an article about Jazz at Lincoln Center. The program, announced in the spring of 1991, has gotten a lot of media attention. It’s undeniable that Lincoln Center’s giving jazz a regular home has “legitimized” it in the eyes of some cultural elites, including foundations and philanthropists, here in the land of its birth-one of the last places the music has won that respect.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis’s Wit and Anger Evoke Visions of America

    Posted on January 16th, 1993 in Review

    “Jazz (Six Syncopated Movements)” is, true to the New York City Ballet’s habit, a new work for the company that is named after its score. The music is by Wynton Marsalis, one of contemporary jazz’s most popular musicians, and it was written for Peter Martins, one of today’s most prominent neo-classical choreographers.   Keep reading »

  • The Young Lions’ Roar : Wynton Marsalis and the ‘Neoclassical’ Lincoln Center Orchestra

    Posted on September 13th, 1992 in Profiles & Interviews

    Halfway through condemning the electronic jazz-funk Miles Davis played in his later years, Wynton Marsalis stops himself. “Don’t print that, all right?” the trumpeter says suddenly. “When (Miles) was alive, I made it clear what I felt about what he was doing, and now that he’s dead I don’t feel I have to say any more about it.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis Soars to New Heights

    Posted on April 11th, 1992 in Review

    Although trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, who opened Thursday at the Westwood Playhouse, is one of the most visible and commercially successful jazz musicians, his creative juices haven’t been diluted.   Keep reading »

  • Blues Alley Cat Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on December 13th, 1991 in Profiles & Interviews

    WYNTON MARSALIS has enjoyed an unusual relationship with the Blues Alley nightclub over the years. Not only has the jazz trumpeter recorded a live album there and conducted numerous workshops with the Blues Alley Youth Orchestra, but he continues to play in the Georgetown club every December even though he now has the commercial clout to headline at Wolf Trap and other theaters.   Keep reading »

  • A Veritable Feast of Music for Christmas

    Posted on December 11th, 1991 in Review

    The holiday pattern is by now familiar. While the networks gorge themselves on Christmas movies, public television sings itself hoarse with music specials. Anything with Luciano Pavarotti, apparently, is considered fail-safe.   Keep reading »

  • He trumpets mature jazz

    Posted on December 8th, 1991 in Profiles & Interviews

    For Marsalis, jazz means the mainstream from the early New Orleans and big-band sound to ‘40s bebop and the variations on bop that came in the ‘50s. He has paved the way for the re-emergence of mainstream in jazz records.   Keep reading »

  • A Heritage Is Affirmed In ‘Griot New York’

    Posted on December 6th, 1991 in

    “Griot New York” is one of the happiest and most poetic dance premieres of the season. This first-time collaboration by the choreographer Garth Fagan, the composer and trumpeter Wynton Marsalis and the sculptor Martin Puryear is constantly blessed with a quality of surprise.   Keep reading »