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  • A Conversation with Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on March 1st, 1997 in

    At 35, Wynton Marsalis already has more accomplishments behind him than most musicians do in a lifetime. Since he first began recording with his own band in 1982, the New Orleans-born trumpeter has put out some 30 albums, won Grammy Awards in both the classical and jazz fields, [and has] performed in countless clubs and concert halls around the world. A passionate teacher as well as a performer, Marsalis has preached his musical message to thousands of young people via master classes, seminars, radio and TV shows. As Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center since 1987, he has helped bring jazz into the cultural mainstream and burnished its respectability as America’s only native art form.   Keep reading »

  • Tapestry in Jazz

    Posted on February 1st, 1997 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis looked uncharacteristically apprehensive when he stepped on stage at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion Thursday night. “I’m nervous,” he acknowledged, looking out at the audience still streaming into seats for the West Coast premiere of his jazz oratorio, “Blood on the Fields.”   Keep reading »

  • The Freedom to Create

    Posted on January 26th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis learned plenty while writing ‘Blood on the Fields,’ a jazz oratorio reflecting on the slave era. But perhaps the most important lesson was about himself.   Keep reading »

  • The Kennedy Center Honors: The Grand Prize

    Posted on December 9th, 1996 in Review

    Last night’s Kennedy Center Honors gala paid tribute to the artistic journey. Sure, it celebrated playwright Edward Albee, composer and instrumentalist Benny Carter, country music star Johnny Cash, actor Jack Lemmon and dancer Maria Tallchief.   Keep reading »

  • Exuberant Motion And Rollicking Jazz

    Posted on August 9th, 1996 in Review

    ONE of the most brilliant conceits of Lincoln Center Festival ‘96 was the pairing of Judith Jamison, the artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, and Wynton Marsalis, the artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center.   Keep reading »

  • A Marsalis Sampler, Both Brief and Complex

    Posted on August 9th, 1996 in Review

    Connected to Judith Jamison’s fast-moving choreography, Wynton Marsalis’s 30-minute score for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s ‘‘Sweet Release,’’ performed Wednesday night at the New York State Theater, had little room for the kind of ecstasy implied in its title. In its favor, the piece felt more like a symphony fiendishly edited to fit on one side of an LP.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis: Speaking from the Melody

    Posted on July 9th, 1996 in Profiles & Interviews

    Trumpeter, composer, author, leader, public figure, educator, father–musician…. Wynton Marsalis is a man of many hats, too many to list here.   Keep reading »

  • From Duke Ellington, Themes for the Movies

    Posted on May 13th, 1996 in Review

    Immersing oneself in the music of Duke Ellington gives the sense that he did everything that could possibly be done in jazz. His body of work, which starts in 1923 and ends in 1974, is so loaded with ideas that new movement after new movement in jazz could be sustained by continuing down avenues where he ventured for just a few blocks but then went on to something else. Mr. Ellington was restless, and it made his music fertile.   Keep reading »

  • Veteran Saxophonists Show More Than Age

    Posted on April 15th, 1996 in Review

    Against the blank canvas of a neutral rhythm section, eight of the better improvisers in jazz grappled in a cutting contest at Avery Fisher Hall on Friday. Called “Battle Royale: Trumpets and Tenors 2,” it was the public face of what the writer Albert Murray has named “antagonistic cooperation,” where musicians, challenged by their peers, ape pushed into further excellence.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis Presents His Spin on World of Jazz

    Posted on April 8th, 1996 in Review

    “Jazz,” Wynton Marsalis says in the opening scenes of Bravo’s “South Bank Show,” “prizes individuality. It teaches you how to project your personality, and how to discover the positive and negative things about yourself.”   Keep reading »