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  • What Jazz Is - and Isn’t

    Posted on July 31st, 1988 in Profiles & Interviews

    My generation finds itself wedged between two opposing traditions. One is the tradition we know in such wonderful detail from the enormous recorded legacy that tells anyone who will listen that jazz broke the rules of European conventions and created rules of its own that were so specific, so thorough and so demanding that a great art resulted. This art has had such universal appeal and application to the expression of modern life that it has changed the conventions of American music as well as those of the world at large.   Keep reading »

  • With Hampton and Marsalis, the 40’s and Today

    Posted on July 2nd, 1988 in Review

    Lionel Hampton and Wynton Marsalis, respectively the last active band leader from the big band era of the 1940’s and the currently most publicized young jazz musician, shared a JVC Jazz Festival Concert on Wednesday evening at Avery Fisher Hall.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis Plays Cornet Showpieces

    Posted on March 25th, 1987 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis’s latest demonstration of classical virtuosity is a revival of showpieces written by, and for, the cornetists who led bands at the turn of the century.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis with Philharmonic

    Posted on November 22nd, 1985 in Review

    THERE were not many furrowed brows at the New York Philharmonic last evening. The concert certainly put little strain on anyone’s powers of concentration or ratiocination, offering nothing heavier than Dvorak’s Symphony No. 7 in D minor, which turned up at the end as ballast to hold down what otherwise could have done duty as a pops program.   Keep reading »

  • Trumpet: Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on August 26th, 1984 in Review

    The sensational young trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, who has appeared most often hereabouts as a jazz player, walked away with the show at the Mostly Mozart Festival’s final program Friday in Fisher Hall   Keep reading »

  • Jazz Swings Back To Tradition

    Posted on June 17th, 1984 in Profiles & Interviews

    THE CROWD OUTSIDE SWEET Basil, on a Monday not long ago, is so large and so eager that even jaded Greenwich Village strollers stop to ask who’s playing inside the jazz club. David Murray and Wynton Marsalis, they are told; that’s why the place is packed. That made several Mondays in a row that the David Murray Big Band drew full houses, playing a stack of new compositions that cut exultantly across the history of jazz.   Keep reading »

  • Kathleen Battle Sings Bach

    Posted on December 5th, 1983 in Review

    Kathleen Battle’s concert at Alice Tully Hall last night seemed almost a conscious rejection of the song recital format. There were no French or Italian songs, no lieder, no operatic extracts, but in their place, Bach, spirituals and jazz.   Keep reading »

  • Sonny Rollins Meets Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on June 5th, 1983 in Review

    The meeting of the saxophonist Sonny Rollins and the trumpeter Wynton Marsalis finally came to pass Friday night at the Beacon Theater, and it was worth the wait. The concert was originally scheduled last month at Town Hall, but that show got off to a false start when Mr. Rollins fainted early in the first set, shortly after he first locked horns with Mr. Marsalis. It was rescheduled, and ticket holders were offered a choice of refunds or new tickets for the Beacon Theater show.   Keep reading »

  • Modern New Orleans

    Posted on August 23rd, 1982 in Review

    At the Public Theater’s New Orleans-New York jazz concerts on Friday and Saturday, the wind players strolled onto the stage to begin solos, offstage to end them. It was a subtle but direct reminder of the connection between this sextet and the marches and street parades that lend so much New Orleans music its syncopated strut - a tradition that came through the modern harmonies of the sextet’s compositions.   Keep reading »

  • A Modern Kind of New Orleans Jazz In Town

    Posted on August 20th, 1982 in Profiles & Interviews

    JAZZ as we know it began in New Orleans. Black musicians may have been improvising a jazzlike music in other cities and towns in the early years of this century, but Buddy Bolden, King Oliver, Jelly Roll Morton, Sidney Bechet, Louis Armstrong and the other innovators who stamped their identities on the new music and breathed life into it were all New Orleans men.   Keep reading »