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News Updates – Big Train

  • Now Available The Caboose (Big Train) - Full Score + Parts

    Posted on March 24th, 2011 in Music

    The first piece from the Wynton Marsalis Big Band collection is now available for purchase and instant download. The Caboose is the final song from the larger work called Big Train. It’s a traditional big band instrumentation of 2 Alto Sax, 2 Tenor Sax, 1 Baritone Sax, 4 Trumpets, 3 Trombones, Piano, Bass and Drums.

      Keep reading »

  • Journey with Jazz at Lincoln Center on BET Jazz

    Posted on September 20th, 2002 in News

    Imagine a journey through some of the most soulful jazz music played by an ensemble of the world’s best jazz musicians and performed at some of the most interesting and historic venues internationally. Sounds pretty enticing, but perhaps impossible, right? Not anymore, thanks to BET Jazz: The Jazz Channel and Jazz at Lincoln Center.   Keep reading »

  • Interview with Wynton Marsalis Musical Director, trumpet

    Posted on July 1st, 1998 in Profiles & Interviews

    Really, soloing is just like talking. You don’t know exactly what you’re going to say but you have an idea and then, as it starts to come out of your mouth, you start to organize it. You even organize the sound of a sentence as you go along. You give, you take some and you give some. And even when you’re listening to somebody, you’re waiting for the time for them to stop, or even if they don’t stop, you’re waiting for a certain moment.   Keep reading »

  • Big Band, Big Premiere, Big Tour, Big Marsalis

    Posted on March 21st, 1998 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra have spent the last several months touring the world, and on Thursday night at Alice Tully Hall, over several hours of technically perfect playing, it showed. Mr. Marsalis and the orchestra, who will be performing again tonight as part of Jazz at Lincoln Center, were completely at ease moving through difficult music; the sharp juxtapositions Mr. Marsalis throws around in his pieces were never forced, and horn and percussion riffs were tossed in the air with the precision of a piece of industrial equipment stamping out a metal part. And at least one musician nodded off to sleep.   Keep reading »