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News Updates – Jazz At Lincoln Center

  • Jazz at Lincoln Center to Reach From Brazil to New Orleans

    Posted on March 26th, 2001 in News

    The longer works of John Coltrane and Charles Mingus, an Abbey Lincoln retrospective and a Brazilian music festival are among more than 400 events worldwide planned by Jazz at Lincoln Center for its 11th season as a year-round producer, starting in September.   Keep reading »

  • Marathon Man. Anything but Conventional

    Posted on December 11th, 1999 in Profiles & Interviews

    The phone won’t quit ringing, the front door keeps swinging open and the parade of visitors never seems to stop. The scene, however, is not Grand Central Station. But it’s perhaps the second busiest spot in midtown Manhattan: Wynton Marsalis’ high-rise apartment near Lincoln Center, where he directs the most sweeping jazz performance program in the country, if not the planet.   Keep reading »

  • A Jazz Success Story With a Tinge of the Blues: At Lincoln Center, Defining the Canon Draws Fire

    Posted on September 22nd, 1998 in Profiles & Interviews

    The scene at the Supper Club on West 47th Street seemed to evoke the glory days of jazz—an ebullient swing band playing classic Ellington tunes as dancers in period costumes rocketed around the dance floor.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz at the Center

    Posted on May 12th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    When Wynton Marsalis received the Pulitzer Prize recently for his three-and-a-half slavery oratorio, Blood on the Fields, he was the first jazz composer ever so recognized (Duke Ellington was specifically rejected by the board). But Marsalis - whose success at 35 as a composer, popularizer, teacher and institution-builder is unrivaled—is still an angry young man, albeit a charming and eloquent one.   Keep reading »

  • Exuberant Motion And Rollicking Jazz

    Posted on August 9th, 1996 in Review

    ONE of the most brilliant conceits of Lincoln Center Festival ‘96 was the pairing of Judith Jamison, the artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, and Wynton Marsalis, the artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center.   Keep reading »

  • A Marsalis Sampler, Both Brief and Complex

    Posted on August 9th, 1996 in Review

    Connected to Judith Jamison’s fast-moving choreography, Wynton Marsalis’s 30-minute score for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s ‘‘Sweet Release,’’ performed Wednesday night at the New York State Theater, had little room for the kind of ecstasy implied in its title. In its favor, the piece felt more like a symphony fiendishly edited to fit on one side of an LP.   Keep reading »

  • From Duke Ellington, Themes for the Movies

    Posted on May 13th, 1996 in Review

    Immersing oneself in the music of Duke Ellington gives the sense that he did everything that could possibly be done in jazz. His body of work, which starts in 1923 and ends in 1974, is so loaded with ideas that new movement after new movement in jazz could be sustained by continuing down avenues where he ventured for just a few blocks but then went on to something else. Mr. Ellington was restless, and it made his music fertile.   Keep reading »

  • Veteran Saxophonists Show More Than Age

    Posted on April 15th, 1996 in Review

    Against the blank canvas of a neutral rhythm section, eight of the better improvisers in jazz grappled in a cutting contest at Avery Fisher Hall on Friday. Called “Battle Royale: Trumpets and Tenors 2,” it was the public face of what the writer Albert Murray has named “antagonistic cooperation,” where musicians, challenged by their peers, ape pushed into further excellence.   Keep reading »

  • Swing-Era Orchestrations Handled With Assurance

    Posted on March 25th, 1996 in Review

    So much is changing so rapidly in the institutional jazz world that Jazz at Lincoln Center’s “Golden Pen,” Saturday’s concert of swing-era arrangements, sounded like a fairly normal programming ploy. Five years ago, the idea to display a series of often-brilliant arrangements might have seemed radical; it is now rare but accepted practice, and the pleasure gained is less from novelty and more from the sensuousness of the music itself.   Keep reading »

  • Changing the Beat

    Posted on March 25th, 1996 in Profiles & Interviews

    New York’s Lincoln Center. For 34 years, home to the world of classical music. Now there’s a new sound in the house. (music) It’s a new sound for Lincoln Center but not a new sound–like Duke Ellington’s New Orleans Suite.   Keep reading »