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News Updates – Jazz At Lincoln Center

  • A Marsalis Sampler, Both Brief and Complex

    Posted on August 9th, 1996 in Review

    Connected to Judith Jamison’s fast-moving choreography, Wynton Marsalis’s 30-minute score for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s ‘‘Sweet Release,’’ performed Wednesday night at the New York State Theater, had little room for the kind of ecstasy implied in its title. In its favor, the piece felt more like a symphony fiendishly edited to fit on one side of an LP.   Keep reading »

  • From Duke Ellington, Themes for the Movies

    Posted on May 13th, 1996 in Review

    Immersing oneself in the music of Duke Ellington gives the sense that he did everything that could possibly be done in jazz. His body of work, which starts in 1923 and ends in 1974, is so loaded with ideas that new movement after new movement in jazz could be sustained by continuing down avenues where he ventured for just a few blocks but then went on to something else. Mr. Ellington was restless, and it made his music fertile.   Keep reading »

  • Veteran Saxophonists Show More Than Age

    Posted on April 15th, 1996 in Review

    Against the blank canvas of a neutral rhythm section, eight of the better improvisers in jazz grappled in a cutting contest at Avery Fisher Hall on Friday. Called “Battle Royale: Trumpets and Tenors 2,” it was the public face of what the writer Albert Murray has named “antagonistic cooperation,” where musicians, challenged by their peers, ape pushed into further excellence.   Keep reading »

  • Swing-Era Orchestrations Handled With Assurance

    Posted on March 25th, 1996 in Review

    So much is changing so rapidly in the institutional jazz world that Jazz at Lincoln Center’s “Golden Pen,” Saturday’s concert of swing-era arrangements, sounded like a fairly normal programming ploy. Five years ago, the idea to display a series of often-brilliant arrangements might have seemed radical; it is now rare but accepted practice, and the pleasure gained is less from novelty and more from the sensuousness of the music itself.   Keep reading »

  • Changing the Beat

    Posted on March 25th, 1996 in Profiles & Interviews

    New York’s Lincoln Center. For 34 years, home to the world of classical music. Now there’s a new sound in the house. (music) It’s a new sound for Lincoln Center but not a new sound–like Duke Ellington’s New Orleans Suite.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis and His Band Rework Monk and Others

    Posted on February 26th, 1996 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis reconvened his septet, added the clarinetist Michael White and performed the music of Jelly Roll Morton and Thelonious Monk and his own music for a show at Alice Tully Hall on Saturday night. It was hard not to get the idea that there wasn’t much ambition in the program, which is part of the Jazz at Lincoln Center series;   Keep reading »

  • Lincoln Center Elevates Status Of Jazz

    Posted on December 19th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    In 1987, when Lincoln Center’s director of visitor services, Alina Bloomgarden, started a small, three-concert jazz program to take advantage of the dark concert halls of August, she hadn’t a clue what would happen to her series.   Keep reading »

  • Kathleen Battle, Jazz Headliner

    Posted on September 14th, 1995 in Review

    What was Kathleen Battle doing as the headliner in the first concert of the season for Jazz at Lincoln Center? She was singing spirituals and lullabies, mostly. In what qualified as a pops concert for the jazz series, she was drawing a crowd to Avery Fisher Hall on Tuesday night (and performing at Lincoln Center after a public falling-out with the Metropolitan Opera).   Keep reading »

  • Bill Cosby Leads Benefit For Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Posted on June 2nd, 1995 in Review

    One thing Lincoln Center’s benefit for its jazz program at Avery Fisher Hall on Wednesday night proved was that Bill Cosby, the night’s M. C., wasn’t to be challenged.   Keep reading »

  • Young man with a horn

    Posted on March 1st, 1993 in Profiles & Interviews

    A couple of months ago I got a phone call from a writer working on an article about Jazz at Lincoln Center. The program, announced in the spring of 1991, has gotten a lot of media attention. It’s undeniable that Lincoln Center’s giving jazz a regular home has “legitimized” it in the eyes of some cultural elites, including foundations and philanthropists, here in the land of its birth-one of the last places the music has won that respect.   Keep reading »