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News Updates – Classical Music

  • Violin Concerto By Wynton Marsalis Blends Jazz And Classical Music

    Posted on October 8th, 2019 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis’ rare musical versatility has long been a beacon in the worlds of jazz and classical music. Now the Grammy Award-winning trumpeter and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer brings those worlds together in two new works for violin written for one of today’s foremost violinists.   Keep reading »

  • Primo Artists signs Wynton Marsalis for Symphonic Composition Representation

    Posted on May 31st, 2019 in News

    Primo Artists announces the signing of Wynton Marsalis to its roster for Symphonic Composition Representation effective immediately. Representation will be handled by Charlotte Lee, President and Founder of Primo Artists. Marsalis joins a distinguished roster that comprises violinist/conductor Itzhak Perlman, violinists Joshua Bell and Nicola Benedetti, pianists Beatrice Rana and Seong-Jin Cho, and conductors Cristian Măcelaru, Christian Reif and Gemma New.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis: Bending to the Music

    Posted on September 16th, 2016 in Profiles & Interviews

    “He’s a bad cat, man,” saxophonist Branford Marsalis once commented to me about his trumpet-playing younger brother, Wynton. The adjective was, of course, complimentary. “But I don’t want to be as disciplined as him,” the saxophonist sibling continued. “That just ain’t fun.”   Keep reading »

  • 10 Questions to Wynton Marsalis by Sinfini Music

    Posted on October 29th, 2015 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis is the Grammy Award and Pulitzer Prize-winning trumpeter-composer behind some of the 21st century’s greatest jazz works. A seasoned classical performer and composer, too, he will next week oversee the world premiere of his new violin concerto, written for Nicola Benedetti. So what makes him tick?   Keep reading »

  • Wynton @ 50 - Downbeat

    Posted on January 17th, 2012 in Profiles & Interviews

    All eyes have turned to a special birthday taking place in the jazz community: Wynton Marsalis turned 50 on Oct. 18. In celebration of Marsalis’ birthday, a number of people in the music shared their thoughts on Wynton and his professional and/or personal impact.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Picks Five Albums for New Listeners

    Posted on January 2nd, 2011 in Music | 2

    Out of his own discography, Wynton has selected five albums for those who are just learning about his music.

      Keep reading »

  • Imaginary Jazz Encounters The Real Thing

    Posted on May 11th, 1998 in Review

    Stravinsky’s ‘‘Histoire du Soldat’’ is not the modest theater piece it first appears to be. Its newness, or better its anti-oldness, encapsulates more or less everything 20th-century composers have ever tried to do.   Keep reading »

  • The Classical Wynton Marsalis Turns Up Again

    Posted on May 3rd, 1998 in Profiles & Interviews

    ‘MAN, that’s hard to play,’’ the trumpet virtuoso Wynton Marsalis said recently. ‘‘That’s what goes through the minds of trumpet players when they hear it.’’ Mr. Marsalis, the artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, was speaking of a piece outside his usual domain, Stravinsky’s 1918 masterpiece ‘‘L’Histoire du Soldat’’ (’‘The Soldier’s Tale’‘).   Keep reading »

  • The downside of Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on April 24th, 1998 in Profiles & Interviews

    On Tuesday, April 28, Wynton Marsalis will appear at the Wisconsin Union Theater to perform one of his new compositions and Igor Stravinsky’s “L’Histoire du Soldat” with the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. When he does, you’ll hear his fans talk about what a genius he is, making comments about his mastery of jazz and classical forms—a real Renaissance man.   Keep reading »

  • Devilishly Entertaining

    Posted on April 29th, 1988 in Review

    Igor Stravinsky’s “L’Histoire du Soldat” (“The Soldier’s Tale”) endures as one of the most haunting works in the 20th Century chamber repertory for at least two reasons. First, its startling dissonance and brittle instrumental writing sum up radical musical ideas that were emerging during the years of World War I (Stravinsky completed the piece in 1918). Second, its storyline—which traces the devil’s seductions and the consequences his victims must face—clearly holds universal appeal.   Keep reading »