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News Updates – Profiles & Interviews

  • Jazz Swings Back To Tradition

    Posted on June 17th, 1984 in Profiles & Interviews

    THE CROWD OUTSIDE SWEET Basil, on a Monday not long ago, is so large and so eager that even jaded Greenwich Village strollers stop to ask who’s playing inside the jazz club. David Murray and Wynton Marsalis, they are told; that’s why the place is packed. That made several Mondays in a row that the David Murray Big Band drew full houses, playing a stack of new compositions that cut exultantly across the history of jazz.   Keep reading »

  • MARSALIS: Jazz meets classics

    Posted on February 6th, 1984 in Profiles & Interviews

    LINCOLN Centre, New York City, June, 1983. Wynton Marsalis, a 21-year-old trumpet player was sharing the bill with Miles Davis, a man whom Marsalis had admired at one time, but whose own playing has deteriorated over the years. Davis came out to the cheers of the converted. His band droned through an hour of mushy jazz-rock rhythms while he filled the air with trumpet notes, most of them unmemorable.   Keep reading »

  • Plenty on the horn

    Posted on February 5th, 1984 in Profiles & Interviews

    “I’m gonna be who I am regardless of who I listen to,” says Wynton Marsalis, the young trumpeter who has been setting both the jazz and classical music worlds on their ears with his apparently boundless talent and technique.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis emerges full-blown

    Posted on October 7th, 1983 in Profiles & Interviews

    At 17, Wynton Marsalis of New Orleans was a year shy of the required age to play classical music at Tanglewood. Having performed the Haydn Trumpet Concerto with the New Orleans Philharmonic at 14 was impressive enough, but it took more than that to beat the rules and get into the prestigious festival.   Keep reading »

  • A cool Cat Who Plays It Smart

    Posted on June 4th, 1983 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis, the sensational 21-year-old jazz trumpeter from New Orleans – he’s a cool one. On the night of April 23 during a concert at New York’s Town Hall he was looking directly into the face of the man with whom he was playing music – it was Sonny Rollins, the tenor saxophonist – when the unexpected happened.   Keep reading »

  • A Common Understanding (Wynton and Branford Marsalis interview): Downbeat December 1982

    Posted on December 16th, 1982 in Profiles & Interviews

    Nineteen eighty-two was the year of Wynton Marsalis – down beat readers crowned him Jazz Musician of the Year; his debut LP copped Jazz Album of the Year honors; and he was named No. 1 Trumpet (handily defeating Miles in each category).   Keep reading »

  • Darting into the Stratosphere

    Posted on August 28th, 1982 in Profiles & Interviews

    We’re walking up from the downstairs bar at Ronnie’s, and Wynton Marsalis swivels to check my silvery noose. Of course, I tell him where I got it (you think I’m going to tell you?).   Keep reading »

  • A Modern Kind of New Orleans Jazz In Town

    Posted on August 20th, 1982 in Profiles & Interviews

    JAZZ as we know it began in New Orleans. Black musicians may have been improvising a jazzlike music in other cities and towns in the early years of this century, but Buddy Bolden, King Oliver, Jelly Roll Morton, Sidney Bechet, Louis Armstrong and the other innovators who stamped their identities on the new music and breathed life into it were all New Orleans men.   Keep reading »

  • A family of music phenoms

    Posted on May 23rd, 1982 in Profiles & Interviews

    It would require a long journey back into musical history to find a sibling team as precociously talented as the Marsalis Brothers. A couple of years ago they were just a pair of teen-agers unknown outside their New Orleans home, presently they have the hottest and most widely publicized new combo in jazz, a CBS Records contract, and a schedule that takes in festivals around the United States and Europe.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz Families Bridge The Generation Gap

    Posted on May 16th, 1982 in Profiles & Interviews

    During the early decades of jazz it wasn’t at all unusual to find fathers and sons playing together in the same bands and indulging in familial give-and-take - mature musicianship and on-the-job know-how versus youthful innovation and first-time exuberance. In the black neighborhoods of New Orleans and the other cities where jazz flourished early, only the holier-than-thou looked down on music as a profession. It was an honorable route out of the black ghetto, in many cases the only route.   Keep reading »