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  • Sondheim and Marsalis to Collaborate on Show for City Center

    Posted on April 22nd, 2013 in Concerts | 0

    Stephen Sondheim and Wynton Marsalis are collaborating on a new show to be staged at the New York City Center next November that will feature jazz interpretations of Mr. Sondheim’s love songs. The show, “A Bed and a Chair: A New York Love Story,” marks the first time Mr. Sondheim, one of musical theater’s great lyricists and composers, and Mr. Marsalis, the master jazz trumpeter, have worked together.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz as conversation - Marsalis explores instincts, teamwork behind a good performance

    Posted on April 19th, 2013 in Articles | 0

    Great jazz requires a strange alchemy of instinct and expertise, of empathy and teamwork from its musicians — a fact few know better than famed artist and composer Wynton Marsalis. Jazz is a conversation, but a nuanced, swift, and complicated one, he said. At Sanders Theatre on Wednesday, Marsalis and a band of all-star musicians both discussed and demonstrated how to achieve that balance in “At the Speed of Instinct: Choosing Together to Play and Stay Together,” the fourth of Marsalis’ six-part lecture series at Harvard that began in 2011. Coming just two day’s after Monday’s bombings at the Boston Marathon, the performance provided a collective respite for the campus.   Keep reading »

  • Listen up, says Marsalis - Master class at the Boston Arts Academy

    Posted on April 18th, 2013 in Articles | 0

    As many parents can attest, rousing a child from sleep to make it to the bus stop can be a difficult task. Doing so during a vacation week would seem near impossible. But on Thursday, a group of students from Boston and Cambridge happily rose from bed and made it to class. The reason? Wynton Marsalis was in the house. For an hour and a half the famous trumpeter conducted a master class at the Boston Arts Academy, the city’s only public high school for the visual and performing arts.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz At Lincoln Center Launches New Tuition Free Education Program

    Posted on April 11th, 2013 in News | 0

    Jazz at Lincoln Center launches the Jazz at Lincoln Center Youth Orchestra (JLCYO) program, a new tuition free initiative for local students. Twenty high school student musicians from the tri-state area (New York, New Jersey, Connecticut) who meet the program admission requirements will be selected to comprise the JLCYO.  The musicians will be provided with the opportunity to enhance their musical education with the finest professional training and performance opportunities.  Applications are due on Friday, May 10th.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis returns to Harvard for the fourth in his series of lectures-performance

    Posted on March 27th, 2013 in Streaming | 2

    “We will discuss and demonstrate the techniques, concepts, methods, opportunities and objectives that encourage spontaneous, intelligent and cohesive group decision-making in our music. We will also illuminate how each member of the quintet asserts, accompanies and adjusts to balance the freedom of improvisation with the sacrificial demands of finding and maintaining our common rhythm, known as swing.”   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis at The Grammy Museum at LA Live

    Posted on March 26th, 2013 in News | 0

    Wynton Marsalis is the latest artist to be added to our fourth-floor Enduring Traditions permanent exhibition. Four Enduring Traditions pods, lined with unique artifacts and oversize imagery, beckon you to explore the history of some of America’s most significant musical traditions: pop, folk, sacred, classical, blues, and jazz. Inside, vintage footage and interviews with a broad spectrum of musical artists capture the essence of the music.   Keep reading »

  • At the Octoroon Balls: String Quartet No. 1 Now Available in our Sheet Music Store

    Posted on March 12th, 2013 in Sheet Music | 0

    We are happy to announce the availability of the score and parts to Wynton’s first and only string quartet: At the Octoroon Balls. The sheet music is presented in two formats: PDF downloads which can be printed at home; or a professional set of parts and score printed, bound and shipped by Subito Music. • Full score (PDF Download – print at home) $25 • Full set of parts and score (PDF Download – print at home) $75 • Full set of parts and score (Printed, bound and shipped by Subito music) $120   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis and Suzan-Lori Parks discussing music and American identity

    Posted on March 1st, 2013 in Interview, Video | 1

    On February 28, the Public Forum continued its season of Duets devoted to music with an insightful conversation about our songs, our memories, and America’s troubled relationship to its rich artistic heritage. Two of the most thoughtful people in the American arts came together at Joe’s Pub for this Public Forum Duet: Wynton Marsalis (Pulitzer and Grammy-winning composer, musician, author, and Managing and Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center) and Suzan-Lori Parks (Topdog/Underdog, Porgy and Bess, Master Writer Chair of The Public Theater).   Keep reading »

  • Jazz at Lincoln Center Announces 2013-14 Season

    Posted on February 27th, 2013 in Concerts | 0

    New York, NY (February 27, 2013)  Today Jazz at Lincoln Center announced its 2013-14 Concert and Education Season which boasts a diverse range of artistry and embodies the concept “all jazz is modern” (see attached chronology).  Compelling new programs, concerts, and series feature some of today’s finest musicians performing in Rose Theater, The Allen Room and Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Frederick P. Rose Hall, which the Wall Street Journal called a “crowning achievement of Jazz at Lincoln Center’s remarkable rise from a three-concert 1987 series dubbed ‘Classical Jazz’ to a full constituent within Lincoln Center.   Keep reading »

  • An Oratorio of History With History of Its Own

    Posted on February 25th, 2013 in Review | 0

    By the time of Wynton Marsalis’s 1994 oratorio, “Blood on the Fields,” written for three singers and a 15-piece band, his scale for musical structure and organizational planning was big and getting bigger. He was 32 then. Jazz at Lincoln Center hadn’t yet become a constituent part of the larger Lincoln Center organization, and the idea of a dedicated theater for jazz hadn’t even been proposed. But he had already written extended works and had developed a framework for identifying and explaining jazz’s standards of excellence, and for linking the music to the history of black Americans and the notion of cultural survival. Never before had such power resided within one jazz musician, and those who doubted him wanted to be impressed on every possible level — especially after “Blood” won the 1997 Pulitzer Prize for music.   Keep reading »