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News Updates – Playbill Arts

  • Congo Square Rising Up

    Posted on May 3rd, 2006 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis and Jazz at Lincoln Center bring comfort and jazz to the city of New Orleans.

    It’s been about nine months since Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005. Today, the area is slowly being rebuilt. Jazz at Lincoln Center Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis has led efforts to heal his native city but his journey there this past month was planned well before the unforeseen disaster. Marsalis and the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra (LCJO) performed a series of free events for people of all ages, including concerts, master classes, clinics, and workshops during a weeklong residency, April 17-23. The events were co-sponsored by the state of Louisiana and the French Quarter Festival in New Orleans.

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  • William Vacchiano, Wynton’s trumpet professor, died at 93

    Posted on September 23rd, 2005 in News | 3

    William Vacchiano, a trumpeter whose musical career started in Maine and took him to the New York Philharmonic and The Juilliard School, died at 93 on September 19, 2005. Vacchiano was principal trumpet for 31 years at the New York Philharmonic and he never missed a performance before leaving in 1973. He continued to a teach until 2002 at The Juilliard School, where his students included Wynton Marsalis and Miles Davis.

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  • Wynton Marsalis Pens Music for Rattner’s Eatonville

    Posted on September 2nd, 2003 in News | 1

    Amas Musical Theatre, whose previous productions include Zanna, Don’t! and Little Ham, will offer a new play with music this fall.
    The 35-year-old multi-ethnic, not-for-profit theatre company will present — from Oct. 21-Nov. 23 — Bonnie Lee Rattner’s Eatonville, which boasts an original jazz score and songs by Wynton Marsalis. Based on Zora Neale Hurston’s novel “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” Eatonville is set in 1920’s Eatonville, Florida, one of the first all-black incorporated American towns.

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