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  • Five City “LOUIS” Tour Reviewed

    Posted on September 5th, 2010 in Review | 1

    From August 25th through August 31st Wynton, Cecile Licad and a 10-piece jazz ensemble premiered Louis, a silent film directed by Dan Pritzker. The sold out tour reached five cities and was reviewed by press from around the world.

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  • At Trumpeter’s Home, the Door’s Always Open

    Posted on May 7th, 2010 in Profiles & Interviews

    On Thursday evening, Joey Pero walked past Lincoln Center and stepped into the lobby of a luxury high-rise apartment building on West 66th Street and told the doorman, “We’re here to see Wynton.”   Keep reading »

  • Remembering Walter Cronkite and What He Stood For

    Posted on September 9th, 2009 in News

    Before a hall filled with his friends, protégés and occasional competitors, the late CBS anchorman Walter Cronkite was remembered at a memorial service on Wednesday for upholding a journalistic standard that is, President Obama said, “a little bit harder to find today.”   Keep reading »

  • At the White House, a Blend of Jazz Greats and Hopefuls

    Posted on June 15th, 2009 in Review

    It was not the full-force, let-a-thousand-saxophones-bloom, this-is-our-music festival that some might have wished from a White House where the language of jazz seems to have a place, at least in the president’s iPod. But it was a good start. On Monday afternoon, Michelle Obama invited about 150 high school jazz students to the White House for a program called Jazz Studio. There was a student clinic including five members of the Marsalis family and the clarinetist Paquito D’Rivera, and then a short concert introduced by the first lady.   Keep reading »

  • Experiencing America, With Foot and Instrument

    Posted on December 19th, 2008 in Review

    The climax of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater’s 50th-anniversary season, which has emphasized live music, has arrived in the middle of its run, with two programs whose first two-thirds are each to music by Duke Ellington. To play these, Wynton Marsalis (on trumpet) and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra (conducted by Eric Reed, some 19 musicians in all) occupy the back of City Center’s stage.   Keep reading »

  • Bicoastal Swing and Stomp in a Lively Onstage Face-Off

    Posted on October 26th, 2008 in Review

    In Jazz at Lincoln Center’s business model of jazz, competition brings heroism. Particularly group heroism: a band, preferably being challenged by another band, is its preferred symbol of jazz’s health.   Keep reading »

  • A Pianist Fully in Charge of Everything He Surveys

    Posted on September 19th, 2008 in Review

    Ahmad Jamal stood up repeatedly from the piano at the Rose Theater on Thursday night, almost always during a song. His reasons had to do with the act of management, which plays an important role in his music. Sometimes he turned to face the rest of his rhythm section, as if to observe its progress or pass silent judgment. Sometimes he was making an announcement, or cuing the big band onstage. It was the kickoff for Jazz at Lincoln Center’s new season, but the timing felt almost incidental. Mr. Jamal had the floor, unequivocally, and he wasn’t interested in behaving like a guest.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis Mass Honors Harlem Church

    Posted on April 14th, 2008 in Review

    A young institution pays tribute to a venerable one with Wynton Marsalis’s “Abyssinian 200: A Celebration.” It was written for the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, founded in 1988, in honor of the 200th anniversary of the Abyssinian Baptist Church, a bulwark of African-American New York City. The orchestra introduced the work last week at its own Rose Theater.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton to be interviewed for New York Times Arts and Leisure Weekend

    Posted on January 2nd, 2008 in News | 1

    On January 11, 2007, Wynton will be interviewed by John Rockwell during The New York Times Arts and Leisure Weekend.

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  • Sounds That Remain Miles Ahead

    Posted on October 27th, 2007 in Review

    In the best of Gil Evans’s work, nothing signifies a finished style. Achieving his kind of openness took stubborn drive: The ease with which his arranging and composing came to connect Maurice Ravel, George Gershwin, Duke Ellington, Kurt Weill, Claude Thornhill, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Gerry Mulligan, Charles Mingus and Jimi Hendrix didn’t indicate a path of least resistance. His work, from the 1940s to the 1980s, represents jazz’s thousand limbs, its endless reach.   Keep reading »