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News Updates – Louis Armstrong

  • Listen to Wynton on Jazz at Lincoln Center Radio

    Posted on August 19th, 2004 in Music

    Works by Louis Armstrong, Jelly Roll Morton, King Oliver, Sidney Bechet and other New Orleans masters’ highlight the rich compositions from jazz’s first decades.
    This program features Wynton Marsalis, Herlin Riley, Michael White and Reginald Veal with smokin’ reinterpretations of Oliver’s Dippermouth Blues,” Morton’s “Fingerbuster,” Bechet’s classic “Wildcat Blues” and more.

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  • Wynton Marsalis and Stanley Crouch Discuss ‘Louis Armstrong at 100’ in Miller Theatre

    Posted on January 20th, 2000 in News

    Opening its inaugural “Jazz and American Culture” series for 2000 with a celebration of Louis Armstrong in his centennial year, the newly established Center for Jazz Studies will present a conversation about the jazz great’s legacy with acclaimed trumpeter Wynton Marsalis and critic Stanley Crouch on Tuesday, Feb. 1 at Miller Theatre.
    The program, “The Artistry of ‘Pops’: Louis Armstrong at 100,” will be moderated by Professor Robert O’Meally, a leading interpreter of the dynamics of jazz in American culture, editor of a seminal textbook for jazz studies and founder and director of The Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia.

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  • Imitating Armstrong As a Form Of Praise

    Posted on December 22nd, 1994 in Review

    The two programs of Louis Armstrong’s music on Saturday and Monday nights, presented by Jazz at Lincoln Center as part of its series The Armstrong Continuum, clearly represented an enormous amount of work. Nearly 40 pieces were played, with Monday night’s program at Avery Fisher Hall digging deep into Armstrong’s rarely performed orchestral works and Saturday’s at Alice Tully Hall working through the revolutionary early works of Armstrong and King Oliver, among others. It is difficult music, and not just for Armstrong’s trumpet parts; the pre-swing rhythms are hard to make come alive, and the orchestral works, even the barest ones, were often complicated by show-biz virtuosity.   Keep reading »