Home»News Updates

News Updates

  • Lincoln Center Elevates Status Of Jazz

    Posted on December 19th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    In 1987, when Lincoln Center’s director of visitor services, Alina Bloomgarden, started a small, three-concert jazz program to take advantage of the dark concert halls of August, she hadn’t a clue what would happen to her series.   Keep reading »

  • The Pied Piper of Jazz

    Posted on October 8th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    The Pied Piper of Jazz : You can call Wynton Marsalis an accomplished musician, a great teacher or a respected bandleader, but his friends just call him Hoghead.   Keep reading »

  • Kathleen Battle, Jazz Headliner

    Posted on September 14th, 1995 in Review

    What was Kathleen Battle doing as the headliner in the first concert of the season for Jazz at Lincoln Center? She was singing spirituals and lullabies, mostly. In what qualified as a pops concert for the jazz series, she was drawing a crowd to Avery Fisher Hall on Tuesday night (and performing at Lincoln Center after a public falling-out with the Metropolitan Opera).   Keep reading »

  • New Tricks Introduced For a Cause

    Posted on September 12th, 1995 in Review

    Benefit concerts can bring out unusual behavior in performers. Freed from the responsibility of being a sole headliner, they can try new things or team up for one-time-only collaborations, even if fans still yell for the hits. At the Paramount on Sunday night, Pete Townshend played piano in public for the first time; Paul Simon sang harmony with him on “The Kids Are All Right.” Wynton Marsalis, famed for his jazz purism, lent trumpet solos to “You Can Call Me Al”; in the same song, Annie Lennox delivered a verse in a thick Scottish accent, while Mr. Townshend suddenly turned into a hoofer. The concert raised $850,000 for the Children’s Health Fund, which provides medical care for poor children.   Keep reading »

  • The Battle of the Bands, Part Two

    Posted on July 3rd, 1995 in Review

    Silence played a big part in the Battle of the Bands, a showdown between the jazz orchestras of Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center on Friday night at Avery Fisher Hall. The concert, in its second year as part of the JVC Jazz Festival, featured two orchestras at their peak.   Keep reading »

  • Bill Cosby Leads Benefit For Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Posted on June 2nd, 1995 in Review

    One thing Lincoln Center’s benefit for its jazz program at Avery Fisher Hall on Wednesday night proved was that Bill Cosby, the night’s M. C., wasn’t to be challenged.   Keep reading »

  • Imitating Armstrong As a Form Of Praise

    Posted on December 22nd, 1994 in Review

    The two programs of Louis Armstrong’s music on Saturday and Monday nights, presented by Jazz at Lincoln Center as part of its series The Armstrong Continuum, clearly represented an enormous amount of work. Nearly 40 pieces were played, with Monday night’s program at Avery Fisher Hall digging deep into Armstrong’s rarely performed orchestral works and Saturday’s at Alice Tully Hall working through the revolutionary early works of Armstrong and King Oliver, among others. It is difficult music, and not just for Armstrong’s trumpet parts; the pre-swing rhythms are hard to make come alive, and the orchestral works, even the barest ones, were often complicated by show-biz virtuosity.   Keep reading »

  • It’s the End of the Riff for Wynton Marsalis’s Septet

    Posted on December 1st, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis made news in his first set on Tuesday night at the Village Vanguard. Before he began to play, the trumpeter and band leader announced that this week’s engagement would be the last for his septet, one of the most influential and active bands in jazz.   Keep reading »

  • An OffBeat Interview With Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on December 1st, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis is a very prolific writer, but most of compositions have been of the musical variety—notes on staffs rather than words on paper. Until now. The New Orleans-born, multiple Grammy-winning trumpeter, widely considered the most influential jazz musician of his generation, has expanded his repertoire by authoring a 192-page hardback book, Sweet Swing Blues on the Road, in collaboration with photographer Frank Stewart. It is due in bookstores on Dec. 12.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis Takes Jazz To Church

    Posted on June 2nd, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Years from now, they’ll still be talking about the concert that lit up a grand old church on the South Side of Chicago. They’ll reminisce about the jazz band that dared to offer a three-hour show from the pulpit of a 19th Century house of worship. They’ll recall how brilliantly the seven musicians played, how frequently the congregation sprang to its feet, how often it fell silent during passages of mystery and reverie.   Keep reading »