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News Updates – Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra

  • From Duke Ellington, Themes for the Movies

    Posted on May 13th, 1996 in Review

    Immersing oneself in the music of Duke Ellington gives the sense that he did everything that could possibly be done in jazz. His body of work, which starts in 1923 and ends in 1974, is so loaded with ideas that new movement after new movement in jazz could be sustained by continuing down avenues where he ventured for just a few blocks but then went on to something else. Mr. Ellington was restless, and it made his music fertile.   Keep reading »

  • Swing-Era Orchestrations Handled With Assurance

    Posted on March 25th, 1996 in Review

    So much is changing so rapidly in the institutional jazz world that Jazz at Lincoln Center’s “Golden Pen,” Saturday’s concert of swing-era arrangements, sounded like a fairly normal programming ploy. Five years ago, the idea to display a series of often-brilliant arrangements might have seemed radical; it is now rare but accepted practice, and the pleasure gained is less from novelty and more from the sensuousness of the music itself.   Keep reading »

  • The Pied Piper of Jazz

    Posted on October 8th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    The Pied Piper of Jazz : You can call Wynton Marsalis an accomplished musician, a great teacher or a respected bandleader, but his friends just call him Hoghead.   Keep reading »

  • The Battle of the Bands, Part Two

    Posted on July 3rd, 1995 in Review

    Silence played a big part in the Battle of the Bands, a showdown between the jazz orchestras of Carnegie Hall and Lincoln Center on Friday night at Avery Fisher Hall. The concert, in its second year as part of the JVC Jazz Festival, featured two orchestras at their peak.   Keep reading »

  • Bill Cosby Leads Benefit For Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Posted on June 2nd, 1995 in Review

    One thing Lincoln Center’s benefit for its jazz program at Avery Fisher Hall on Wednesday night proved was that Bill Cosby, the night’s M. C., wasn’t to be challenged.   Keep reading »

  • My home is the road

    Posted on May 1st, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    Take your time.” That’s what Wynton Marsalis always says to the musicians on his bandstand. At a New York City recording session) for his acclaimed big-band suite, _Blood On The Fields_, he reminds vocal soloist Miles Griffith to do just that during the work’s moving climax.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis Takes a Long Look at Slavery

    Posted on April 4th, 1994 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis’s skills have grown as fast as his ambition, and he is the most ambitious younger composer in jazz. On Friday night at Alice Tully Hall, he led the world premiere of his first work for big band, “Blood on the Fields,” a large composition—nearly three hours of music—about a vast topic, slavery. The piece was commissioned by Jazz at Lincoln Center, of which Mr. Marsalis is the artistic director.   Keep reading »

  • The Young Lions’ Roar : Wynton Marsalis and the ‘Neoclassical’ Lincoln Center Orchestra

    Posted on September 13th, 1992 in Profiles & Interviews

    Halfway through condemning the electronic jazz-funk Miles Davis played in his later years, Wynton Marsalis stops himself. “Don’t print that, all right?” the trumpeter says suddenly. “When (Miles) was alive, I made it clear what I felt about what he was doing, and now that he’s dead I don’t feel I have to say any more about it.   Keep reading »