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  • A lovely evening of jazz

    Posted on May 7th, 1989 in Review

    What can a trumpet player who is considered by many to be the most important jazz musician of the ‘80s play? Anything he wants.   Keep reading »

  • Review/Jazz; The New Orleans in Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on March 30th, 1989 in Review

    His first note of the evening was a plunger-muted growl, and throughout the concert’s two sets he used the smears and rasps of early jazz along with the pure-toned, agile melodic style he is known for. Mr. Marsalis, a scholar of jazz-trumpet styles, has clearly been reinvestigating the work of Bubber Miley, who growled bluesy solos for the Duke Ellington Orchestra in the 1920’s.   Keep reading »

  • Trumpet master Marsalis doubles as a jazz teacher

    Posted on February 25th, 1989 in Profiles & Interviews

    NEW YORK - Commerce vs. education – that’s the tug of war influencing the music young people are exposed to. Or at least that’s the view of young trumpet virtuoso Wynton Marsalis.   Keep reading »

  • Signs of Intelligent Life in Music Television

    Posted on October 30th, 1988 in Review

    One evening this month as I was riffling through television by remote control, I happened to spot the stern, cherubic face of Wynton Marsalis. The young jazz trumpeter was the guest on a program called ‘‘New Visions,’’ a weekly two-hour series that airs on Sundays at 10 P.M. on the 24-hour cable music channel, VH-1.   Keep reading »

  • Pop Classics for Horn

    Posted on August 11th, 1988 in Review

    Jazz musicians rarely get credit for keeping Tin Pan Alley standards current through the rock era. Yet they continue to honor that repertory, both by reclaiming pop melodies with eloquent phrasing and by evading them to reveal ingenious harmonic structures.   Keep reading »

  • What Jazz Is - and Isn’t

    Posted on July 31st, 1988 in Profiles & Interviews

    My generation finds itself wedged between two opposing traditions. One is the tradition we know in such wonderful detail from the enormous recorded legacy that tells anyone who will listen that jazz broke the rules of European conventions and created rules of its own that were so specific, so thorough and so demanding that a great art resulted. This art has had such universal appeal and application to the expression of modern life that it has changed the conventions of American music as well as those of the world at large.   Keep reading »

  • Devilishly Entertaining

    Posted on April 29th, 1988 in Review

    Igor Stravinsky’s “L’Histoire du Soldat” (“The Soldier’s Tale”) endures as one of the most haunting works in the 20th Century chamber repertory for at least two reasons. First, its startling dissonance and brittle instrumental writing sum up radical musical ideas that were emerging during the years of World War I (Stravinsky completed the piece in 1918). Second, its storyline—which traces the devil’s seductions and the consequences his victims must face—clearly holds universal appeal.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis’s success not a 1-man effort

    Posted on January 20th, 1988 in Review

    It’s easy to hear the music of Wynton Marsalis and focus on the seven Grammy awards the trumpeter has won. But no small part of the horn man’s success in jazz rests on the strengths of his band – and those strengths were more than evident last night.   Keep reading »

  • The Wynton Marsalis Interview: 1987

    Posted on November 5th, 1987 in Profiles & Interviews

    We last interviewed Wynton Marsalis in 1984. Since that time his popularity and notoriety have, if anything, grown and, as can be seen in the following interview, he views his position with the utmost responsibility and seriousness.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis displays his warm side at jam session

    Posted on September 7th, 1987 in Review

    A piece of Montreux-Detroit Jazz Festival history went down in the wee hours of Sunday morning when trumpeter Wynton Marsalis and his band showed up to play at the New Rapa House Jam sessions in the Hotel Pont-chartriin. The moment revealed a rarely seen side of Marsalis and confirmed his dedication to these disintegrating proving grounds of traditional jazz.   Keep reading »