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News Updates

  • Wynton Marsalis Presents His Spin on World of Jazz

    Posted on April 8th, 1996 in Review

    “Jazz,” Wynton Marsalis says in the opening scenes of Bravo’s “South Bank Show,” “prizes individuality. It teaches you how to project your personality, and how to discover the positive and negative things about yourself.”   Keep reading »

  • Swing-Era Orchestrations Handled With Assurance

    Posted on March 25th, 1996 in Review

    So much is changing so rapidly in the institutional jazz world that Jazz at Lincoln Center’s “Golden Pen,” Saturday’s concert of swing-era arrangements, sounded like a fairly normal programming ploy. Five years ago, the idea to display a series of often-brilliant arrangements might have seemed radical; it is now rare but accepted practice, and the pleasure gained is less from novelty and more from the sensuousness of the music itself.   Keep reading »

  • Changing the Beat

    Posted on March 25th, 1996 in Profiles & Interviews

    New York’s Lincoln Center. For 34 years, home to the world of classical music. Now there’s a new sound in the house. (music) It’s a new sound for Lincoln Center but not a new sound–like Duke Ellington’s New Orleans Suite.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis and His Band Rework Monk and Others

    Posted on February 26th, 1996 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis reconvened his septet, added the clarinetist Michael White and performed the music of Jelly Roll Morton and Thelonious Monk and his own music for a show at Alice Tully Hall on Saturday night. It was hard not to get the idea that there wasn’t much ambition in the program, which is part of the Jazz at Lincoln Center series;   Keep reading »

  • Lincoln Center Elevates Status Of Jazz

    Posted on December 19th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    In 1987, when Lincoln Center’s director of visitor services, Alina Bloomgarden, started a small, three-concert jazz program to take advantage of the dark concert halls of August, she hadn’t a clue what would happen to her series.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis, Top Tutor

    Posted on October 9th, 1995 in Review

    It’s precisely because trumpet virtuoso Wynton Marsalis is equally comfortable in classical music and jazz—he studied at both the Juilliard and Blakey schools—that he’s so adept hosting “Marsalis on Music,” a four-part music appreciation program aimed at young listeners. It airs on Channel 26 tonight at 8 and the next three Mondays.   Keep reading »

  • Joys of a Primer On Tempo and Tone

    Posted on October 9th, 1995 in Review

    Today’s tax-slashing politicians, all too eager to cut school and other budgets, tend to think of the arts as frills, if not downright tools of subversion. Students in public schools, especially in urban areas, are getting less and less grounding in the arts, and often none at all.   Keep reading »

  • The Pied Piper of Jazz

    Posted on October 8th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    The Pied Piper of Jazz : You can call Wynton Marsalis an accomplished musician, a great teacher or a respected bandleader, but his friends just call him Hoghead.   Keep reading »

  • Kathleen Battle, Jazz Headliner

    Posted on September 14th, 1995 in Review

    What was Kathleen Battle doing as the headliner in the first concert of the season for Jazz at Lincoln Center? She was singing spirituals and lullabies, mostly. In what qualified as a pops concert for the jazz series, she was drawing a crowd to Avery Fisher Hall on Tuesday night (and performing at Lincoln Center after a public falling-out with the Metropolitan Opera).   Keep reading »

  • New Tricks Introduced For a Cause

    Posted on September 12th, 1995 in Review

    Benefit concerts can bring out unusual behavior in performers. Freed from the responsibility of being a sole headliner, they can try new things or team up for one-time-only collaborations, even if fans still yell for the hits. At the Paramount on Sunday night, Pete Townshend played piano in public for the first time; Paul Simon sang harmony with him on “The Kids Are All Right.” Wynton Marsalis, famed for his jazz purism, lent trumpet solos to “You Can Call Me Al”; in the same song, Annie Lennox delivered a verse in a thick Scottish accent, while Mr. Townshend suddenly turned into a hoofer. The concert raised $850,000 for the Children’s Health Fund, which provides medical care for poor children.   Keep reading »