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  • Marsalis Officiates As Classical Weds Jazz

    Posted on May 9th, 1995 in Review

    Lincoln Center’s executives have for years been trying to arrange marriages, or at least trysts, between the center’s constituents, and on Sunday afternoon at Alice Tully Hall one of these unions bore fruit. The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and Jazz at Lincoln Center collaborated on a program that brought together jazz-inspired classics and improvisations in classic jazz styles.   Keep reading »

  • A Luxuriance of Twyla Tharp

    Posted on May 3rd, 1995 in Review

    Rather than pay tribute to dead choreographers and composers, import guest stars or rush patrons to a dinner where the flower arrangements are as important as the program, American Ballet Theater opted for a change of pace on the gala scene.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis dazzles Viterbo Crowd

    Posted on April 24th, 1995 in Review

    The jazz man in the golden suit with the golden horn brought a glorious end Sunday night to Viterbo College’s 1994-95 Bright Star Season. Nothing could be finer than Wynton Marsalis and his sweet golden sound as he serenaded a sellout crowd of 1,100 at Viterbo’s Fine Arts Center Main Theater.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis isn’t afraid of controversy

    Posted on April 23rd, 1995 in

    The acclaimed jazzman has never backed down from his assertion that certain American jazz works need to be recognized as canonical.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis, Roberts renew musical bonds in impromptu reunion

    Posted on April 19th, 1995 in Review

    Two reigning jazz virtuosos were reunited in impromptu fashion Tuesday night, and the results were as profound as they were accessible, as technically brilliant as they were musically direct.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz, he says

    Posted on April 13th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis is a perpetual explorer. The 33-year-old premier jazz trumpeter said he continues to develop his art form by experimenting with musical styles and configuration of groups. Marsalis has played R&B, classical and popular music.   Keep reading »

  • A change of key - His Septet behind him, Marsalis takes a new direction

    Posted on April 9th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    It was one of the most sublime jazz bands of the late ‘80s and early “90s, an ensemble so distinctive in personality, so lustrous in tone and so brilliant in technique as to set a standard toward which other young groups aspired.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz Rage

    Posted on March 19th, 1995 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis, the premier jazz figure of his time, leans against his black baby grand, lovingly explaining the life and legacy of Louis Armstrong to a Brazilian TV crew. The interview was supposed to have ended half an hour ago, but Marsalis waves off his publicist. He is hard into Teacher Wynton mode now, tracing Armstrong year by year from New Orleans to a Chicago ballroom.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis’ music best thing since sliced (nut) bread

    Posted on February 25th, 1995 in Review

    In Biblical terms, finding fault with God is virtually an impossible task. In jazz terms, Wynton Marsalis is God. Take the hint. If there is such a thing as musical perfection, Marsalis and his dazzling quartet showed it last night at Vanderbilt’s Langford Auditorium.   Keep reading »

  • Imitating Armstrong As a Form Of Praise

    Posted on December 22nd, 1994 in Review

    The two programs of Louis Armstrong’s music on Saturday and Monday nights, presented by Jazz at Lincoln Center as part of its series The Armstrong Continuum, clearly represented an enormous amount of work. Nearly 40 pieces were played, with Monday night’s program at Avery Fisher Hall digging deep into Armstrong’s rarely performed orchestral works and Saturday’s at Alice Tully Hall working through the revolutionary early works of Armstrong and King Oliver, among others. It is difficult music, and not just for Armstrong’s trumpet parts; the pre-swing rhythms are hard to make come alive, and the orchestral works, even the barest ones, were often complicated by show-biz virtuosity.   Keep reading »