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News Updates

  • CLASSICAL MUSIC; The Classical Wynton Marsalis Turns Up Again

    Posted on May 3rd, 1998 in Profiles & Interviews

    ‘MAN, that’s hard to play,’’ the trumpet virtuoso Wynton Marsalis said recently. ‘‘That’s what goes through the minds of trumpet players when they hear it.’’ Mr. Marsalis, the artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, was speaking of a piece outside his usual domain, Stravinsky’s 1918 masterpiece ‘‘L’Histoire du Soldat’’ (’‘The Soldier’s Tale’‘).   Keep reading »

  • Jazz musician of the year: Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on December 15th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    If everything had gone according to plan, Wynton Marsalis would have taken a long, deep breath in 1997, stepping out of the public eye for a sorely needed sabbatical.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis: Interview by Ted Panken

    Posted on April 14th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    The Reigning Genius of Jazz to his admirers, the Emperor With No Clothes to his debunkers, Wynton Marsalis has attracted public attention and provoked ferociously divergent responses like few musicians in the music’s history. Since his emergence in the early 1980’s as a trumpet virtuoso and composer-bandleader, the result of Marsalis’ choice and treatment of material and his penchant for salty public statements is a public persona akin to a massive lightning rod or magnet that absorbs and repels the roiling opinions and attitudes informing the contemporary Jazz zeitgeist.   Keep reading »

  • Changing the Beat

    Posted on March 25th, 1996 in Profiles & Interviews

    New York’s Lincoln Center. For 34 years, home to the world of classical music. Now there’s a new sound in the house. (music) It’s a new sound for Lincoln Center but not a new sound–like Duke Ellington’s New Orleans Suite.   Keep reading »

  • Bill Cosby Leads Benefit For Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Posted on June 2nd, 1995 in Review

    One thing Lincoln Center’s benefit for its jazz program at Avery Fisher Hall on Wednesday night proved was that Bill Cosby, the night’s M. C., wasn’t to be challenged.   Keep reading »

  • It’s the End of the Riff for Wynton Marsalis’s Septet

    Posted on December 1st, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis made news in his first set on Tuesday night at the Village Vanguard. Before he began to play, the trumpeter and band leader announced that this week’s engagement would be the last for his septet, one of the most influential and active bands in jazz.   Keep reading »

  • An OffBeat Interview With Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on December 1st, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Wynton Marsalis is a very prolific writer, but most of compositions have been of the musical variety—notes on staffs rather than words on paper. Until now. The New Orleans-born, multiple Grammy-winning trumpeter, widely considered the most influential jazz musician of his generation, has expanded his repertoire by authoring a 192-page hardback book, Sweet Swing Blues on the Road, in collaboration with photographer Frank Stewart. It is due in bookstores on Dec. 12.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis Takes Jazz To Church

    Posted on June 2nd, 1994 in Profiles & Interviews

    Years from now, they’ll still be talking about the concert that lit up a grand old church on the South Side of Chicago. They’ll reminisce about the jazz band that dared to offer a three-hour show from the pulpit of a 19th Century house of worship. They’ll recall how brilliantly the seven musicians played, how frequently the congregation sprang to its feet, how often it fell silent during passages of mystery and reverie.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis Takes a Long Look at Slavery

    Posted on April 4th, 1994 in Review

    Wynton Marsalis’s skills have grown as fast as his ambition, and he is the most ambitious younger composer in jazz. On Friday night at Alice Tully Hall, he led the world premiere of his first work for big band, “Blood on the Fields,” a large composition—nearly three hours of music—about a vast topic, slavery. The piece was commissioned by Jazz at Lincoln Center, of which Mr. Marsalis is the artistic director.   Keep reading »

  • Review/Ballet; Marsalis’s Wit and Anger Evoke Visions of America

    Posted on January 16th, 1993 in Review

    “Jazz (Six Syncopated Movements)” is, true to the New York City Ballet’s habit, a new work for the company that is named after its score. The music is by Wynton Marsalis, one of contemporary jazz’s most popular musicians, and it was written for Peter Martins, one of today’s most prominent neo-classical choreographers.   Keep reading »