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  • Hark! The Heralded Jazzmen Swing Some Familiar Melodies

    Posted on December 17th, 2005 in Review | 4

    Somewhere between ritual and remnant lies the jazz Christmas concert. As a manifestation of pure secular middle-class civility, it represents a vague and probably disappearing middle ground, even in Manhattan.   Keep reading »

  • Lincoln Center’s Man With the Trumpet, With Orchestra

    Posted on November 19th, 2005 in Review | 5

    Just before the lights dimmed in the Rose Theater on Thursday night, a voice announced that while the use of cellphones was prohibited, hand-clapping, foot-stomping and cries of “Aw, yeah!” were all welcome forms of audience participation. It was a hokier introduction than one might have expected from a concert called “Wynton With Strings.” But in a way, it suited both subject and setting.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz ABZ reviewed on the New York Times

    Posted on November 17th, 2005 in Books, Review | 0

    The New York Times has just published a review on the new book Jazz ABZ written by Wynton and illustrated by Paul Rogers.   Keep reading »

  • An Epic History of Black Experience, in Music and Movement

    Posted on November 11th, 2005 in Review | 0

    Garth Fagan and Wynton Marsalis have been friends for more than 20 years, and since 1991 have collaborated frequently. Wednesday night at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater, to open a run through Sunday of Garth Fagan Dance, Mr. Marsalis and his septet played live for a lovely revival of their first collaboration, “Griot New York,” first seen at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.   Keep reading »

  • The Return of the Broadway Boogie-Woogie

    Posted on November 7th, 2005 in Profiles & Interviews | 0

    THE choreographer Garth Fagan and Wynton Marsalis, the co-founder and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, go way back. They met in the 1980’s when Mr. Fagan, a jazz aficionado, took his dancers to New York clubs to hear Mr. Marsalis play. “I knew we could learn from him,” Mr. Fagan said in a recent conference call with Mr. Marsalis. “I sensed we saw things the same way.” Eventually he invited Mr. Marsalis to a rehearsal at the company’s headquarters in Rochester.   Keep reading »

  • Combining Forces to Revive the Soul of New Orleans

    Posted on October 29th, 2005 in Review | 0

    Music is the soul of society, the heart of culture. So, at least, it was variously pronounced by the likes of Itzhak Perlman and Beverly Sills in the course of an evening devoted to bringing it back. “Bringing Back the Music” was the title of the New York Philharmonic’s joint benefit concert with and for the Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra on Friday night at Avery Fisher Hall. New Orleans, of course, was the intended destination of this particular return: orchestral music in other American cities will have to continue to fend for itself.   Keep reading »

  • Higher Ground benefit concert reviewed on New York Times

    Posted on September 23rd, 2005 in Review | 0

    True to New Orleans ritual, “Higher Ground”—the benefit for Hurricane Katrina relief at the Rose Theater on Saturday night—opened with a processional and wound up with a parade.   Keep reading »

  • Big-Band Music Without the Weight of Nostalgia

    Posted on May 21st, 2005 in Review | 0

    You have to work a little at understanding Thad Jones, the trumpeter and composer. He arrived in New York in 1954, a decade after bebop exploded. He spent nine years playing and arranging with the Count Basie band, and made some lovely but generally overlooked small-group records under his own name. In the mid-1960’s, when so much jazz was open-ended, small-group expressionism, he directed all his energies toward an immaculately sculptured big band.   Keep reading »

  • Don Quixote Rides Again, With an Ellingtonian Sidekick

    Posted on May 12th, 2005 in Review | 0

    More than two hours of original jazz music was played at Rose Theater on Thursday night. It was shaped around stories from “Don Quixote” and scored for 15 musicians and 2 singers, with a professional actor reading about 5,000 words of Cervantes in and around 23 songs and instrumental sketches. It was ambitious, well played, deeply Ellingtonian - and completely indigestible.   Keep reading »

  • Old Friends Get Together, Feeling Right at Home

    Posted on March 12th, 2005 in Review | 1

    When Wynton Marsalis performs with his septet in New York these days, it is a special occasion. He toured Europe with the band a few years ago, but his duties at Lincoln Center as well as his ambitions to compose large works for big ensembles reached critical mass in the late 1990’s. So the septet faded into the background. But it’s good to be reminded of what it achieved. On Wednesday, at Rose Theater, the band entered from stage left, the musicians chanting in a slow single-file entrance, moving and stomping their feet in parade rhythm. As soon as they took their positions and dug into the tune—it was Mr. Marsalis’s “Ain’ No”—they flooded the acoustical space in the room.   Keep reading »