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  • Wynton Marsalis: The Once and Future King of Jazz at Lincoln Center

    Posted on August 27th, 2006 in Profiles & Interviews | 0

    Hollering the blues, backed by a tambourine and twangy acoustic guitar, Mr. Marsalis was a study in contradictions. He was invoking rustic folk traditions while attired in a Brooks Brothers tuxedo and white tie. And he was sounding a note of abject despair while basking in the glow of 1,400 admirers, some of whom had paid as much as $2,500, as part of the fifth annual spring gala of Jazz at Lincoln Center.   Keep reading »

  • Bill Charlap Remembers Thelonious Monk, a Revolutionary Who Knew How to Swing

    Posted on July 22nd, 2006 in Review | 0

    Early in the course of “Brilliant Corners,” the 92nd Street Y’s concert of Thelonious Monk’s music on Thursday night, the pianist Bill Charlap offered a succinct appreciation of Monk’s singular place in jazz. “He was a revolutionary within a revolution,” Mr. Charlap said. The revolution, he went on to explain, was bebop, which Monk helped foment but never fully embraced.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis’s ‘Congo Square,’ With the Lincoln Center Orchestra

    Posted on May 6th, 2006 in Review | 5

    Wynton Marsalis has composed a number of extended works during his tenure as artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, usually with the stated ambition of capturing some aspect of the African-American experience. On Thursday night at the Rose Theater, he conducted his latest such effort, “Congo Square,” featuring the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra and Odadaa!, a nine-piece Ghanaian percussion and vocal troupe.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz at Lincoln Center Plans More ‘Sweep’ in New Season

    Posted on March 10th, 2006 in Profiles & Interviews | 3

    Conservatism has been the charge most often leveled at Jazz at Lincoln Center by its critics over the years. So it is significant that the organization’s next season, its third since it established a permanent home in the Time Warner Center at Columbus Circle, advances the theme “Innovations in Jazz.”   Keep reading »

  • A Visitor From the West Takes Charge of the Band

    Posted on February 27th, 2006 in Review | 4

    Gerald Wilson, the trumpeter, composer, arranger and conductor, is 87. On Thursday at the Rose Theater, taking part in “Central Avenue Breakdown,” a Jazz at Lincoln Center concert centering on Los Angeles jazz, he hijacked the evening. It was not his band, and not his city, but he handled the 15-member Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra like a paper airplane.   Keep reading »

  • Rambling Round Pittsburgh

    Posted on February 18th, 2006 in Review | 5

    The jazz legacy of Pittsburgh confounds easy generalization. There’s no shorthand summary for a city that produced the buoyant pianist Earl (Fatha) Hines as well as the steamrolling drummer Art Blakey and the urbane composer Billy Strayhorn. So Jazz at Lincoln Center wisely makes no claim to comprehensiveness in its Pittsburgh Festival, which takes up two of the three performance spaces at Frederick P. Rose Hall.   Keep reading »

  • Hark! The Heralded Jazzmen Swing Some Familiar Melodies

    Posted on December 17th, 2005 in Review | 4

    Somewhere between ritual and remnant lies the jazz Christmas concert. As a manifestation of pure secular middle-class civility, it represents a vague and probably disappearing middle ground, even in Manhattan.   Keep reading »

  • Lincoln Center’s Man With the Trumpet, With Orchestra

    Posted on November 19th, 2005 in Review | 5

    Just before the lights dimmed in the Rose Theater on Thursday night, a voice announced that while the use of cellphones was prohibited, hand-clapping, foot-stomping and cries of “Aw, yeah!” were all welcome forms of audience participation. It was a hokier introduction than one might have expected from a concert called “Wynton With Strings.” But in a way, it suited both subject and setting.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz ABZ reviewed on the New York Times

    Posted on November 17th, 2005 in Books, Review | 0

    The New York Times has just published a review on the new book Jazz ABZ written by Wynton and illustrated by Paul Rogers.   Keep reading »

  • An Epic History of Black Experience, in Music and Movement

    Posted on November 11th, 2005 in Review | 0

    Garth Fagan and Wynton Marsalis have been friends for more than 20 years, and since 1991 have collaborated frequently. Wednesday night at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater, to open a run through Sunday of Garth Fagan Dance, Mr. Marsalis and his septet played live for a lovely revival of their first collaboration, “Griot New York,” first seen at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.   Keep reading »