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  • Jazz Journal: Wynton Marsalis/Congo Square

    Posted on July 12th, 2012 in Review | 0

    Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz At Lincoln Center Orchestra opened their 2012 residency at London’s Barbican Centre yesterday evening with a superb performance that celebrated the very birth of jazz in company with Ghanian drummer Yacub Addy and the band Odadaa! Congo Square was the public space in New Orleans where African slaves gathered on Sunday afternoons to dance and play, and was the only place in the USA where they could gather freely and celebrate their own music and culture. Inspired by this activity between the mid-1700s and the late 1800s, Marsalis and Ghanaian drum master Yacub Addy’s two-hour suite Congo Square celebrates the joy of that music and marks its influence on the jazz that followed.   Keep reading »

  • The Guardian: Wynton Marsalis with JLCO and Odadaa” at Barbican

    Posted on July 12th, 2012 in Review | 1

    Wynton Marsalis is famously resistant to notions of jazz-fusion. He has denounced attempts to dilute jazz by using funk or rock rhythms, always loudly asserting the primacy of swing in the jazz tradition. African rhythms, however, are rather more problematic for him. These rhythms do not swing in the traditional sense: they do not use swung quavers. Musicologically, they’re as far from his notion of jazz as, say, heavy metal. Yet they are undeniably part of jazz’s DNA.   Keep reading »

  • Congo Square: Wynton Marsalis & the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra, Barbican Hall

    Posted on July 11th, 2012 in Review | 0

    The proud son of New Orleans leads New York’s finest jazz repertory orchestra in his latest work inspired by Louisiana slave culture   Keep reading »

  • Rolling Stone: Paul Simon Gets a Jazz Infusion From Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on April 20th, 2012 in Review | 0

    Paul Simon has never been afraid to take a big musical risk. Two years after Simon and Garfunkel broke up at their commercial peak in 1970, he released his self-titled solo debut, which kicked off with “Mother and Child Reunion.” It was the first time many Americans heard reggae, and when they flipped the record they heard the salsa-tinged “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard.”  Since then, Simon’s music has gone from gospel (“Loves Me Like a Rock”) and Afrobeat (Graceland) to Latin American percussion-based rock (Rhythm of the Saints) and the doo-wop and Latin sounds on The Capeman.   Keep reading »

  • Reviews and Photos from Wynton’s Third Harvard Lecture “Meet Me at the Crossroads”

    Posted on February 14th, 2012 in Review | 0

    Wynton Marsalis recently gave the third of six epic lectures that he is slated to give at Harvard University. He promised that this one wasn’t going to be 4 and half hours long, as the last one was. When he got started, the result was part history lesson, part concert, part spoken-word poetry reading. Three hours into the show, his agenda became clear: He was telling a timeless story about love. For Charlie “Yardbird’’ Parker, inventor of bebop. For Bessie Smith, teller of the low-down nasty truth. For Woody Guthrie, who sang about running from the law. For all those who sang about being both broke and broken-hearted. For every artist who cared more about art than celebrity.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis & Eric Clapton Played The Blues

    Posted on April 12th, 2011 in Review | 8

    Wynton Marsalis and Eric Clapton collaborated forces this past weekend at Jazz at Lincoln Center’s Rose Theater, to explore the shared musical ground between New Orleans, the Delta and Chicago. Joined by eight other stellar musicians, including members of Marsalis’ quintet, Marsalis and Clapton performed the works of W.C. Handy, Louis Armstrong, Howlin’ Wolf, Big Maceo and more. The songs were selected by Clapton, while Marsalis’ arrangements embodied the authentic New Orleans sound of King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band.   Keep reading »

  • Rolling Stone: Eric Clapton, Wynton Marsalis Play the Blues in New York City

    Posted on April 11th, 2011 in Review | 0

    “I pat myself on the back – it took a lot of courage to come here,” Eric Clapton said halfway through his show at New York’s Rose Hall on April 8th, glancing and smiling at the men with him on stage: eight members of the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra, including trumpeter and JALC artistic director Wynton Marsalis. Clapton then introduced the next song, nodding over his shoulder at bassist Carlos Henriquez. “This one was foisted on me by Carlos,” the British guitarist said. “I didn’t think it would work.”   Keep reading »

  • When Marsalis and his orchestra go to Washington, big-band returns with a bang

    Posted on February 1st, 2011 in Review | 0

    Who says jazz can’t draw an audience? On Sunday, Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra presented a performance of uncompromising big-band jazz to a wildly appreciative audience at the sold-out Kennedy Center Concert Hall.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra’s Residency in Havana, Cuba 2010

    Posted on October 14th, 2010 in Photo, Review, Video | 1

    Between the dates October 2nd and October 10th Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center passionately shared their music with children, musicians, and the people of Cuba. The Cuban music community welcomed the JLCO with open arms and the residency resulted in an all-encompassing exchange of music and culture.   Keep reading »

  • In Havana, Jam Sessions With a Master Trumpeter

    Posted on October 11th, 2010 in Review | 0

    HAVANA — Wynton Marsalis pulled a young Cuban trumpeter aside as he left the Mella Theater here on Wednesday after a Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra concert. The band was here for a residency that ended over the weekend, and Mr. Marsalis had seen 17-year-old Kalí Rodríguez play a few nights earlier at an official reception for the American musicians.   Keep reading »