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  • Trumpetinghis Mission – Jazz Great Marsalis Wants Folks To Learn To Listen

    Posted on January 7th, 2000 in Profiles & Interviews

    AT 38, Wynton Marsalis is the most respected trumpet player in jazz. He’s also the most honored. A multi-Grammy winner and artistic director of the Lincoln Center Jazz Program, he’s even won a Pulitzer — in 1997 he was given the prize for his composition “Blood on the Fields,” which addressed racism in the United States.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis’ Epic `All Rise’ Reaches High

    Posted on January 3rd, 2000 in Review

    NEW YORK — It isn’t often that the combined forces of a symphony orchestra, large jazz ensemble and 60-voice choir share a stage. But considering the stylistic range and expressive breadth of the music at hand, perhaps the sheer number of musicians jammed into Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center should not have been surprising.   Keep reading »

  • Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra: Live in Swing City Swingin’ With The Duke

    Posted on August 26th, 1999 in Review

    What a responsibility, what an inspiring challenge, what an honor it is to have the opportunity to replicate and help preserve the greatest body of music America has yet given to the world! Intimidating and awesome, to be sure, but that is exactly what the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra has undertaken in its endeavor to keep the majesty of Duke Ellington’s music alive. Although sometimes assailed for a perceived conservatism by those who equate anarchy and iconoclasm with esthetic quality or “progress,” the LCJO is actually maintaining an honorable and ancient tradition, as exemplified by man’s innate need to revere and perpetuate by ritual the memory of his ancestors.   Keep reading »

  • Ellington At 100: Reveling in Life’s Majesty

    Posted on January 17th, 1999 in Profiles & Interviews

    IN Duke Ellington’s world, people are smiling, they are dancing and they are making love. They’re having a good time because his music’s most basic concern is uplift of the human spirit. It’s a music that celebrates freedom of expression, freedom of choice. That’s why we love it. It wants us to love being ourselves and to revel in the majesty of life.   Keep reading »

  • A Jazz Success Story With a Tinge of the Blues: At Lincoln Center, Defining the Canon Draws Fire

    Posted on September 22nd, 1998 in Profiles & Interviews

    The scene at the Supper Club on West 47th Street seemed to evoke the glory days of jazz—an ebullient swing band playing classic Ellington tunes as dancers in period costumes rocketed around the dance floor.   Keep reading »

  • CLASSICAL MUSIC; The Classical Wynton Marsalis Turns Up Again

    Posted on May 3rd, 1998 in Profiles & Interviews

    ‘MAN, that’s hard to play,’’ the trumpet virtuoso Wynton Marsalis said recently. ‘‘That’s what goes through the minds of trumpet players when they hear it.’’ Mr. Marsalis, the artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, was speaking of a piece outside his usual domain, Stravinsky’s 1918 masterpiece ‘‘L’Histoire du Soldat’’ (’‘The Soldier’s Tale’‘).   Keep reading »

  • Jazz musician of the year: Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on December 15th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    If everything had gone according to plan, Wynton Marsalis would have taken a long, deep breath in 1997, stepping out of the public eye for a sorely needed sabbatical.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis: Interview by Ted Panken

    Posted on April 14th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    The Reigning Genius of Jazz to his admirers, the Emperor With No Clothes to his debunkers, Wynton Marsalis has attracted public attention and provoked ferociously divergent responses like few musicians in the music’s history. Since his emergence in the early 1980’s as a trumpet virtuoso and composer-bandleader, the result of Marsalis’ choice and treatment of material and his penchant for salty public statements is a public persona akin to a massive lightning rod or magnet that absorbs and repels the roiling opinions and attitudes informing the contemporary Jazz zeitgeist.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis has turned the hardships of slavery into sublime jazz

    Posted on March 15th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    A three-hour oratorio about the history of slavery where the audience comes out whistling the tunes has to count as some kind of a triumph. Blood on the Fields by Wynton Marsalis - who wrote both the music and the libretto, and who performs the work at the Barbican on Tuesday with his Lincoln Centre Jazz Orchestra and the three featured vocalists of John Hendricks, Miles Griffith and Cassandra Wilson - is an extraordinary achievement by any standards.   Keep reading »

  • A Conversation with Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on March 1st, 1997 in

    At 35, Wynton Marsalis already has more accomplishments behind him than most musicians do in a lifetime. Since he first began recording with his own band in 1982, the New Orleans-born trumpeter has put out some 30 albums, won Grammy Awards in both the classical and jazz fields, [and has] performed in countless clubs and concert halls around the world. A passionate teacher as well as a performer, Marsalis has preached his musical message to thousands of young people via master classes, seminars, radio and TV shows. As Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center since 1987, he has helped bring jazz into the cultural mainstream and burnished its respectability as America’s only native art form.   Keep reading »