Home»News Updates

News Updates

  • Wynton Marsalis: One Future, Two Views

    Posted on March 12th, 2000 in Profiles & Interviews

    The most accomplished and acclaimed jazz musician of his generation, Wynton Marsalis is also as outspoken as he is prolific. Through his own force of personality, intelligence and achievement, he has steadfastly worked to bring jazz back to the center stage in American culture. And he promises, in the new millennium, to “keep the pressure on.” Marsalis finished out the millennium with a flurry of creativity. Together with several important commissioned debuts and an international tour, he released an unprecedented eight albums on Columbia Jazz and Sony Classical. This extraordinary series, subtitled Swinging Into the 21st Century, spans a remarkable scope of original compositions and standards, from jazz to classical. From the rousing big band suite Big Train to the lush and melodic septet composition The Marciac Suite to tributes to jazz pioneers Thelonious Monk and Jellyroll Morton, from his Stravinsky-inspired A Fiddler’s Tale to his string quartet album At The Octoroon Balls, two ballets and a collection of music written for film, the series reflects Wynton’s work ethic and high standards.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis Shows China That Jazz Isn’t Just a Word

    Posted on February 23rd, 2000 in Review

    In their first 48 hours of music making here, Wynton Marsalis and his Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra put on two smooth performances before well-dressed audiences, two educational events for Chinese jazz colleagues and schoolchildren, and two smoking jam sessions with local musicians for a small, ravenous circle of fans.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis and Stanley Crouch Discuss ‘Louis Armstrong at 100’ in Miller Theatre

    Posted on January 20th, 2000 in News

    Opening its inaugural “Jazz and American Culture” series for 2000 with a celebration of Louis Armstrong in his centennial year, the newly established Center for Jazz Studies will present a conversation about the jazz great’s legacy with acclaimed trumpeter Wynton Marsalis and critic Stanley Crouch on Tuesday, Feb. 1 at Miller Theatre. The program, “The Artistry of ‘Pops’: Louis Armstrong at 100,” will be moderated by Professor Robert O’Meally, a leading interpreter of the dynamics of jazz in American culture, editor of a seminal textbook for jazz studies and founder and director of The Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia.   Keep reading »

  • Trumpetinghis Mission – Jazz Great Marsalis Wants Folks To Learn To Listen

    Posted on January 7th, 2000 in Profiles & Interviews

    AT 38, Wynton Marsalis is the most respected trumpet player in jazz. He’s also the most honored. A multi-Grammy winner and artistic director of the Lincoln Center Jazz Program, he’s even won a Pulitzer — in 1997 he was given the prize for his composition “Blood on the Fields,” which addressed racism in the United States.   Keep reading »

  • Marsalis’ Epic `All Rise’ Reaches High

    Posted on January 3rd, 2000 in Review

    NEW YORK — It isn’t often that the combined forces of a symphony orchestra, large jazz ensemble and 60-voice choir share a stage. But considering the stylistic range and expressive breadth of the music at hand, perhaps the sheer number of musicians jammed into Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center should not have been surprising.   Keep reading »

  • Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra: Live in Swing City Swingin’ With The Duke

    Posted on August 26th, 1999 in Review

    What a responsibility, what an inspiring challenge, what an honor it is to have the opportunity to replicate and help preserve the greatest body of music America has yet given to the world! Intimidating and awesome, to be sure, but that is exactly what the Lincoln Center Jazz Orchestra has undertaken in its endeavor to keep the majesty of Duke Ellington’s music alive. Although sometimes assailed for a perceived conservatism by those who equate anarchy and iconoclasm with esthetic quality or “progress,” the LCJO is actually maintaining an honorable and ancient tradition, as exemplified by man’s innate need to revere and perpetuate by ritual the memory of his ancestors.   Keep reading »

  • Ellington At 100: Reveling in Life’s Majesty

    Posted on January 17th, 1999 in Profiles & Interviews

    IN Duke Ellington’s world, people are smiling, they are dancing and they are making love. They’re having a good time because his music’s most basic concern is uplift of the human spirit. It’s a music that celebrates freedom of expression, freedom of choice. That’s why we love it. It wants us to love being ourselves and to revel in the majesty of life.   Keep reading »

  • A Jazz Success Story With a Tinge of the Blues: At Lincoln Center, Defining the Canon Draws Fire

    Posted on September 22nd, 1998 in Profiles & Interviews

    The scene at the Supper Club on West 47th Street seemed to evoke the glory days of jazz—an ebullient swing band playing classic Ellington tunes as dancers in period costumes rocketed around the dance floor.   Keep reading »

  • Jazz musician of the year: Wynton Marsalis

    Posted on December 15th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    If everything had gone according to plan, Wynton Marsalis would have taken a long, deep breath in 1997, stepping out of the public eye for a sorely needed sabbatical.   Keep reading »

  • Wynton Marsalis: Interview by Ted Panken

    Posted on April 14th, 1997 in Profiles & Interviews

    The Reigning Genius of Jazz to his admirers, the Emperor With No Clothes to his debunkers, Wynton Marsalis has attracted public attention and provoked ferociously divergent responses like few musicians in the music’s history. Since his emergence in the early 1980’s as a trumpet virtuoso and composer-bandleader, the result of Marsalis’ choice and treatment of material and his penchant for salty public statements is a public persona akin to a massive lightning rod or magnet that absorbs and repels the roiling opinions and attitudes informing the contemporary Jazz zeitgeist.   Keep reading »