Wynton Marsalis Discussion Forum

   

How jazz can continue to inspire

RankRankRank

Total Posts: 69

Joined 2008-09-11

PM

After that discussion about Quincy, I realized that I should lead by example rather than simply challenge through words and rhetoric. I tend to be an over analytical problem solver sometimes which can bristle some people. One friends told me “Charmaine, people don’t like to be challenged all the time.” She of course was right so I am attempting to cool my challenging ways. But in my defense I am a trumpet player for godsakes not to mention an athlete, so challenging is apart of my nature.  In addition, I challenge no one more than myself. I am always painfully aware than when you point one finger at someone else there are three pointing back at you, that is why humility in all walks of life is important. But I digress…

When I am not pontificating on philosophical issues I tend to have what I like to call CCD “Compulsive Creative Disorder.” I blame my years as a PK for this, because whenever my dad’s church needed a skit,  Christmas play, song, or anything creative my mom would ask me. And for some reason this was always on short notice, so perhaps they had CACD “Compulsive Ask Charmaine Disorder”, a disease that I am healing them of by learning that magic word “NO.” However, I am still stuck with CCD and created this little quickie video as an example of how jazz can continue to inspire.

 

 

It mixes an Obama video clip I found online before in a pre-election video and a cool jazz song I like, called Esperanto which means “one who hopes’. It seemed very appropriate I believe for President Obama who wrote the book “The Audacity of Hope: Thoughts on Reclaiming the American Dream”.  Click here to view: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DXZUkSZtbKc

 

Esperanto is on a CD called Kaleidoscope by Sean Jones (btw, if anyone can hook me up with an autographed copy that would be great, because i accidentally deleted from my computer and lost the original).  I tend to be like the old heads that say “jazz music isn’t what it used to be,” so when I hear a young jazz artist that can really hit the spot I am truly inspired and hopeful that Kenny G has not taken over the whole world. As a jazz missionary, it sickens me when I hear someone say “Yeah, I listen to jazz I got my Kenny G and Sade CD right here.” Despite my written diatribes, I am in person a very gracious person so when I hear this mess I usually just grin and bear it, although in my head I am screaming “You have to be f-ing kidding me !!” ROFL.

 

All jokes aside, I completed my Master’s in Instructional Technology this year with an emphasis on instructional design. My dream is to create instructional materials that are historically accurate and ethnically sensitive. For example, as a former homeschooler I loved the Baby Einstein DVD series and I would love to make maybe a Baby Jazz or perhaps a Baby Miles or Marsalis DVD.

 

Jazz is an art form that I would sincerely love to share with my kids. They hound me while I am practicing my horn, so I had to get them their own instruments so I can practice in peace,lol. My 7 year old daughter just started playing Bass in school and my son who is three is surprisingly a fairly good singer, he picks up lyrics very quickly.  I believe ANY type of POSITIVE music a child can get involved in is important for their social, emotional and intellectual development. That is why hip hop is so important to African-American childern in urban areas.

 

Again music is not just about quality it is about inspiring humanity to a higher level of being. It is a form of worship that can be corrupted or purified depending on the heart that it is given.

 

Well speaking of being a mom, time get them ready for school. Have a blessed day :)

     

Signature

Charmaine Nokuri

Historian/Artist

The University of Virgina

RankRankRank

Total Posts: 64

Joined 2007-12-29

PM

Jazz can inspire and in so many different ways.  I am lifted up all the time from some good swing!!!!  Every time I hear a great player playing over hip changes, or giving us something different on a turn around (e.g. KD or Woody Shaw), I am moved to practice more. 

I hear many say that they like jazz when they know so little about the history.  They have not went back and studied Louis Armstrong and the Hot Five, or they haven’t checked out (I mean really listened to a work)Roy Eldridge, Buck Clayton, Fats Navarro, Blue Mitchell, Kenny Dorham, Bill Hardman, Charles Tolliver,  Clark Terry, Diz, Lee Morgan, CATS that created the language. 

 

I hear people all the time tell me they listen to jazz and I always respond with ya’, but are you hearin’ it?  My students all know that when you listen you check out whats happening around the soloist.  What the piano player was doing with his/her comping, what kind of feel is the drummer displaying, what type of lines are coming from the bassist.  How does the trumpeter phrase his eighths….Are they short and pointed like Clifford, or are they longer and more legato like Freddie? How many choruses did the soloist take, what was the soloist mood when they played this solo? 

 

Dang,  just thinking like this makes me want to go shed.  This weekend is Beethoven 8 for me though,  so not much jazz happening at the King house until Monday.

 

Neil King

 

 

PS.  DrWahoo,  I am going to try to hook up with Sean sometime soon.  I live less than 2 hours from him and we have never had a chance to talk.  I emailed him not to long ago mentioning a hang….I will see what I can do about an autograph then for ya.

     
RankRankRankRank

Total Posts: 301

Joined 2006-07-17

PM

Hey, all! Just attended Marsalis Brasilianos featuring Branford Marsalis and members of the Philarmonia Brasileira conducted by Gil Jardim. This was technically a classical program,

but did it SWING with the rhythms and textures of Villa-Lobos and the exotic melodies of Mihaud!! Highlights were the Fantasia for Saxophone and orchestra (Villa-Lobos 1949) and both La Creation du Monde and Scaramouche (Mihaud, 1923 and 1937, respectively).

The music was permeated with jazz melodies, harmonies, and polyphonic rhythms. It was “lighter” in texture than we had expected it to sound.  Branford explained, “In Brazil they created a sound that had traditional sounds with harmony and melody that was very classical, but they retained the rhythmic sensibility. That’s what you hear in Villa-Lobos’ music.”

 

In this case the classical and jazz delineations were totally blurred! The string players were clearly swinging and it was altogether amazing. We were able to meet Branford and his father on the last stop of this wonderful tour. Hopefully there will be a recording soon.

 

There is a transformational quality in music that inspires in contemporary music. The Philharmonia Brasileira captured the intricate rhythms of Latin American music, providing both an homage to Bach and to the modern composer. Such inspiration, I thought I’d add it to this thread!

     
RankRankRank

Total Posts: 53

Joined 2006-09-25

PM

Sean teaches at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. You can probably mail a CD to him care of the music dept there with a self-addressed stamped return packing envelope, and I’m sure he’d sign it and mail it back to you. The school’s address will be on their website at http://www.duq.edu

     
RankRankRank

Total Posts: 69

Joined 2008-09-11

PM

Thanks bandland, I doubt Mr. Jones as a big time jazz artist has time to sign CDs for a no name like me :) Signed or unsigned it is still good music.

     

Signature

Charmaine Nokuri

Historian/Artist

The University of Virgina