Wynton Marsalis Discussion Forum

   

Best Young Trumpet Player

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Well I have exhausted my desire for theoretical discussions on jazz. However, after being on this forum for a few weeks,  I wonder if it is a true microcosm of the greater jazz word. If that is the case I am pretty sure if Wynton handed out purple kool aid at his concerts a lot of people would drink it, ROFL.

Nonetheless I am curious to know what jazz would be like after Wynton walks into eternity. What will his legacy be ?  Who is his heir apparent ? IMHO, a man can only be immortal if he has someone to carry on his name. So who under the age of 50 is on the precipice of carrying his torch ? Besides Roy Hargrove I know no other great young trumpet players.

     

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Charmaine Nokuri

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I saw Mario at the Spotted Cat last night.  He’s aobut 24 and living a whole bunch of other young talents:  Julian on drums, Clarence on sax, etc.  Mario’s got a good sound and can definately stay in the swing with his solos.  But that Julian on drums, I drove all the way back to hear him play a few more songs.

     
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i would say the kids in the crescent jazz institute….... still high school age but when the school is associated with berkelee and julliard, you know theres greatness! one of them graduated and got $80,000 for berkelee, and plays on cruises. talent? definately.

     
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Here’s a short list of great young players:

Nabate Isles, Josh Evans, Peter Evans, Jason Palmer, Jeremy Pelt, Dave Ballou, Ralph Alessi,Taylor Ho Bynum, Kenny Warren, Chris Demeglio, Russ Johnson, Shane Endsley, Lauren Strobel,Eric Biondo, Jonathon Findlaysen,Rob Mazurek, Nate Wooley, Ben Holmes John Carlson, Rick Johnson, Jacob Wick, Jaimie Branch…and many more.

     
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This is a good question, best young trumpet players?  As a New York musician that goes to a lot of sessions and shows, i would definately say the best 10 young trumpet players are: Keyon Harrold, Josh Evans, Jason Palmer, Nick Roseboro, Ambrose Akinmusire, Nabate Isles, Mike Rodriguez, Donvante Mccoy, Maurice Brown, and Leron Thomas. All of these guys except for Mike, Nabate and Donvante are under 30. and all except for Jason (Boston) and Donvante (DC) live in New York. Check em out if like trumpet players that groove. FF

     
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Mike Rodriguez is great, he’s got alot of humor in him.  He has a brother who also plays, but not horns, I think he plays keys.

     
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I don’t know if I would call someone “under 50” young.  Hell, Wynton isn’t even 50 yet.

Among the young trumpet players—twenty-somethings—the guy I thought was going to be real special was Christian Scott.  He has the the right pedigree—he’s alto ace Donald Harrison’s nephew and a Nawlins native—so I had high hopes for him when I saw him a few years ago—when he was literally still a teenager—at a Kind of Blue concert at the JVC Jazz Festival.  Scott burned the house down that night and I thought we would have heard big things from him by now.

 

If it was a decade ago or so during the full flowering of the Young Lions Movement Scott would have been the toast of New York, but he came on the scene after the Young Lions Movement had crested.  He did nab a record deal with Concord a year or two ago. but I gagged when his first CD—fusion—was released.  So much promise.  So much talent.  And this is the crap he is recording?  His more recent follow-up record wasn’t any better.  I’ve pretty much written Christian off or I’ve written him off until he releases a straight-ahead, acoustic disc.

 

Another guy who has been getting some accolades is the aformentioned Akinmuse Ambrose.  He bagged a Thelonious Monk Competition award and has been gigging in and around New York City in recent years as both a sideman with higher profile, more established musicians and on his own at some of the smaller clubs.  I’ve seen him a few times in the brass section of big bands, but have yet to see him lead a band in a small club.  I can’t wait to hear him, however.

 

I’ve also been impressed with Leron Thomas and Keyon Herrold, trumpeters who also been paying their dues in NYC clubs as sidemen and in jam sessions.  Those are two more to watch out for.

     
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Did anyone say Marlon Jordan?  Can anyone say Marlon Jordan? Yes, I would say Marlon Jordan.

     
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Do any of these young players have myspace pages or websites ? I would love to hear some of their music. I am just getting back into playing trumpet. I am mostly classically trained. I didn’t have the patience to learn theory. I don’t care what anyone says Jazz is harder than classical. You need ALOT of brains and a good ear.

     

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Charmaine Nokuri

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Karen Wrote:

———————————————————————————-

> Did anyone say Marlon Jordan?  Can anyone say

> Marlon Jordan? Yes, I would say Marlon Jordan.

Marlon is getting a tad long in the tooth, though.

     
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That’s a blues form, Hardbop.  AAB, you ask, you ask, you answer.

     
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I may be biased but I think Sean Jones is pretty good. The last time I checked he was the lead trumpet player in the .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). I had a chance to meet him a while back and he was pretty cool.The first time I saw him live I was amazed with his technique and the way he could control his sound. After the performance he let me see his trumpet and he was plays on a huge 1C mouthpiece. This blew my mind because usually alot of players use cheater mouthpieces to play as high as he does. He is only 30 so he has a lot of growing to do, but he is going in the right direction. He has a good producer in Orrin Evans, who is also pretty young. It will be interesting to see where these two take jazz over the next few years.

http://www.seanjonesmusic.com

     

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Charmaine Nokuri

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Did you see the chess game posted on the main page?  If you watch that, you see Sean Jones warming up in the corner there before the Friday night Ahmad Jamal show at JALC.  Well, what happened on stage was something else.  JALC did not come out until the second half of the show.  The guys all took their seats, well spread out that night due to the feature presentation of Jamal’s rhythm section, they were placed in front of the orchestra that night.  The first solo was taken by Wynton during a tune with a sweet latin groove.  I’ve listened to recordings of Wynton playing inside Latin vibes, but this one was live, so it was special.  Wynton pointed his horn high and made that sound fill up the Rose Hall.  (thank you, by the way, I was up on the 7th floor that night)  You know Sean Jones, he listens hard to what he hears Wynton say, and that night, a tune or two later, Sean sat back, or should I say laid back, in his chair and blew something so mild, so blue, in a voice like Miles, subtle and quiet but deep, clear, and precise, distinct in mood from everything else heard that night.  Damn, I can actually that I heard him do that, and I mean distinguish himself from everyone else, on another occassion as well. 

But, this past Wednesday, I was over here listening to Irvin Mayfield and Marlon Jordan swap phrases.  They have two totally different sounds.  Marlon Jordan, his voice is closer to what I imagine Buddy Bolden sounded like, it’s got that upper register rawness that I associate with James Zollar, the only trumpet player that I have seen sit in Wynton’s seat (that would be during Congo Square when Marsalis does his Maestro thing).  Marlon, he plays with a lot of feeling; he’ll dance a little bit when he plays, high notes up on his toes, rollin’ through the feet as he carries a tone through the scale, hips on point with a little bit of bebop, excellent but different from Mayfield.  And I thought about that watching them, to be that different and to get up there to play together, that’s courage.  Mayfield has got that technical precision that defines excellence, and his sound is closer to Wynton’s, as his aesthetics must fall under determination’s codified by Marsalis philosophies (Mayfield has a 2008 release out with the patriarch of the family).  Although close, differences do exist.  One thing that I love about Wynton’s playing is how clear his notes are, each note is clean, distinct from the others, even at 120 mph, faster than the record-breaking pitches at the new Yankee Stadium. 

 

Oh wait, I’ll be right back…

     
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This is simply gorgeous.

     
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There are a lot of great trumpeters under the age of 50.  Drwahoo,  you live in the DC area.  Why just in your area there are several very hip trumpeters under 50.  Tom Williams is the freakin’ man!!!  He is also a friend of mine.  My best friend and fellow West V native is a trumpeter that fronts a quintet/quartet in the DC area named Kenny Rittenhouse.  Both Kenny and Tom possess great technical ability, harmonic knowledge and serious swing!!!!  There are many local jazz hero’s playing all over the country that CAN PLAY!!!! 

Many truly believe that the last great trumpet innovator was Woody Shaw.  I too would have to agree that Woody influenced jazz trumpet with his vast harmonic knowledge and musicianship.  However,  without a doubt Wynton has influenced so many young players, me included.  I remember watching Wynton appear on the Grammy awards in 1994.  I was a young 14 year old and was just totally taken with the way that he played and how he carried himself.  He was a total inspiration to me as a player and a musician.  That being said what will his legacy be remains to be seen.  I honestly doubt that he is to concerned with his legacy.  His works and his recordings will all stand the test of time.

 

 

There are many young players that you can check out that are under 50.  The Criss Cross label is a great place to look.  Check out cats like Brian Lynch,  Joe Magnarelli, John Swana.  They all have Criss Cross releases.  Also check out Terrell Stafford, Jeremy Pelt, Sean Jones, Ingrid Jensen, Derrick Gardner, Marlon Jordan, Roy Hargrove, Maurice Brown, Marcus Printup, Ryan Kisor, Terrence Blanchard, Philip Harper, Ron Miles, ect ect….

 

Lot’s of cats to choose from.  Do I think anyone will pick up where Wynton left off..I doubt that will occur.  Few players posses his skill (the man grew as a musician before all of our eyes), personality and marketability.I do however know how he has influenced all of us to get better and practice….

 

 

By the way,  if anyone wants to post sound clips of their playing on here, I think that might be a cool thing.  So I will get things started..You can check out my site to hear different clips..More to come

 

http://www.neil-king.com

     
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Yeah that cats good.